Lumia 800 Goes to Space, Comes Back With Super-Powers

| April 26, 2012 | 46 Replies

test equipment

I know this is a couple days old; but I’ve been feeling so extremly lazy lately I was hoping Jay or Michael would post it- but fine be that way guys. Anyways as part of some “Research” scientists from the University of Southampton sent up a Lumia 800 attached to one of those weather balloons up into the Stratosphere; to test out methods cheaper atmospheric studies.

“We knew the Lumia was very robust. With other phones we’ve had to include an extra battery and a heater. We didn’t need to do that with the Lumia – it was the best.”

Honestly I can’t see how the Lumia made it on a single charge if it was filming/imaging constantly- Although it’s pretty cold “Up There” which means that batteries will last longer (I’ve actually seen people who live on the equator get noticeably less battery life due to faster chemical reactions – high heat = fast reaction speed = less battery life). And of course since Polycarbonate is also used on JumboJets it has no problem in extreme conditions.

The Lumia reached altitudes of 105,000 feet, and survived temperatures of -61C, remaining airborne for 2 hours

The Lumia recorded about 2GBs of images from up top which are all available for download here: http://cdn.conversations.nokia.com.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/Nokia-Lumia-800-flight.zip

We didn’t do this for fun – we used the Nokia Lumia 800 as a serious scientific tool, and the results were remarkable.” - Sure “not for Fun” I gotya ;)

All in all pretty cool; I think Google or Samsung did this with one of their droid launches, can’t be sure thought.

Thanks to everyone who sent this in VIA

Category: Nokia, Windows Phone

About the Author ()

Hey, my name's Ali- Currently a fifth (and final) year Dental Student from Chicago; studying in Jordan. I love all sorts of gadgets almost as much as I love my cookies! Be sure to follow my Twitter handle @AliQudsi and Subcribe to my Youtube for the latest videos - no pressure. Thanks.

Comments (46)

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  1. Michael Faro-Tusino says:

    I honestly didn’t know about it man. Been busy with Operation Unicorn and Uni work that I haven’t looked at the tips.

    Don’t know how it survived in subzero temps but, Seems pretty cool* though. I wanna go to space

    *No pun intended

    • prashant says:

      simply irresistible.

    • Deaconclgi says:

      And I’m in the process of relocating from Georgia to Illinois…..aka 2G land with T-Mobile….

      Finally have time to sit down today, FINALLY have home internet YAY!

      Hopefully I’ll have more free time in May….or June…should be finished with the move by then…blasted 12 hour drives!

  2. Skyfall says:

    Seriously how this Beta phone did able to complete this task? Battery life is still crap even after shit loads of software updates it has received…truly a beta phone huh!

    • arts. says:

      if you proof the researcher is lying. go ahead, prove it. or else, quit writing cockshit.

      • Skyfall says:

        Do you own lumia 800? No you’re not!
        Ask any Lumia 800 user I mean user with Lumia 800 as primary phone about battery life then only talk your jack shits

        • rich says:

          i own one, since the battery update i get about a day and a half to two days with normal usage. Never less than a day. That makes it better than my old N900 and SGS2. My wife’s iPhone 4S barely makes it to 10pm. I have 5 email accounts set to update as mail arrives, carbon twitter app, facebook, weather and some other stuff, so i can’t complain about it at all.

        • Dave says:

          I know who said her battery life went from 1 to 3 days after the final battery update.

          YMMV I guess.

        • arts says:

          So no proof then?

          Please continue using that cock as a mouthgag thank you.

    • Aliqudsi says:

      Hmm wow.. I thought it was the opposite, interesting; but then why have people in warmer temperature been getting noticeabley less battery life?

      • incognito says:

        It’s simple – cold increases internal resistance and slows down chemical reactions, leading to lowered ability to hold charge. Hot, on the other hand, decreases internal resistance and speeds up chemical reactions, leading to quicker discharge. Both are not good as batteries in electronic appliances are designed to work best at room temperatures – alkaline and solid state batteries will work a bit better at lower temperatures, li-ion and li-polymer batteries will work better at slightly warmer temperatures, but the extremes will be diminishing in all cases.

        The thing is – the cold will not severely damage the li-ion/li-polymer batteries, it will just temporarily diminish their ability to move charge. The hot, on the other hand, does permanent damage to the battery as the chemical reactions go quicker than it can handle and the device using the energy cannot discharge them fast enough. In extreme cases of too rapid discharge or too high chemical activity – the battery will go into a chain reaction leading to self-inflaming or even explosion.

        Given that the battery operated appliances heat over time, especially smartphones, laptops and so on – and that their batteries are usually very close to the source of heat, the batteries will get damaged much faster in warm weather than in cold weather as they cannot cool-off properly. That is why, given time, a battery in warm climates will lose its performance sooner than the ones in the cold climates. And will require a change much more often.

        • Aliqudsi says:

          Clears it right up, thanks :D

          • RVM says:

            It is important for mountain climbers to maintain their batteries in warm places, for example in pockets, and inside sleeping bags during night. I think about it everytime when on some colder trip :)

        • s2korpio says:

          Thanks. Now I’m scare of my 710 now from exploding. Then again… it’s a Nokia.

          • incognito says:

            Reputable manufacturers wouldn’t put batteries that don’t have suitable protective circuitry for over-charge or rapid discharge (leading to chemical reactions going awry – from fast over-heating to self-ignition or in extreme cases even explosion) – and not from some love and concern for the safety of their customers, but because there are regulations in most countries regarding consumer appliances. So, at least with factory-provided battery you should not be worried – sure, if that circuitry breaks (and electronics do fail from time to time) while your device is sucking on the ‘juice’, all of the above might happen (and you can find quite a lot of videos and newspaper articles talking about those incidents), but the odds are not really that high. It happened to me only once in the past 15 years – the battery on my N95 bulged so much that it broke the battery cover door, luckily it stopped there before self-ignition. I did, however, experience battery damage and big drops in capacity and performance on a plethora of my laptops given that I was usually buying what is touted as ‘desktop replacement’ category which come with ‘extreme heating’ ‘feature’ attached, and which severely decreases the battery life.

            That being said, with devices sucking more and more juice to power huge screens and power-sucking CPUs and GPUs, which in turn are not only heating the battery from the discharge (the protective circuitry prevents run-away chemical reactions), but also from their own heat dispersion due to electronics inefficiencies, the chances of bad things happening increase dramatically. Mix with it extreme hot climate or circumstances (i.e. leaving your phone on your car dashboard) and bad things can happen that no protective circuitry can stop.

            In warm climates, the best way to carry your phone is in your shirt pocket, or on a belt away from your body so that it at least doesn’t get the additional heat from your body temperature and can easier cool-off while you move. In addition, even if it self-ignites it’s more likely you won’t suffer any injury than if you, for example, have it in your tight pants pocket. As for laptops, it can pay off to buy a cooling pad on a long run.

            Again, those are extreme cases and rare occurrences, but they do happen and people should be reasonably cautious when handling battery operated devices. But no need for paranoia.

  3. twig says:

    If you had a battery problem most carriers have a 30 day return policy.

    No one I know complains about the 800 battery. What apps are you running? It may not be battery but some apps run my n9 wack down the battery. Apple and Android have the same problem with some apps. My older android hated a couple apps.

  4. gabriel9 says:

    Sure you can send a piece of shit into space, but when it comes back it is a still just piece of shit.

    • JamesSB says:

      shit for brains.

      • gabriel9 says:

        Do you have any evidence for that? Do you know me? And as i know first letter in the sentence is always uppercase. Return to school and then we will continue conversation.

        • Bassman says:

          Can I just point out….

          1) “And as i know” – The “i” should be upper case.
          2) “then we will continue conversation” – I would suggest that to make that grammatically correct you should put “the” between “continue” and “conversation”.

          People in glass houses and all that jazz….

          • gabriel9 says:

            Thanks for corrections. I learned English language by myself. So there is still some issues. :/

            So you know English language but you are just lazy. That’s even worse.

            I never heard that: “People in glass houses and all that jazz….”
            Do you think i just sit in the house and read comments on blogs? :D

  5. masood.alkhter says:

    shit!

  6. PleaseConsiderMyArgumentsFirst says:

    A frozen shit may not smell as used to smell in normal temperature, this can be a kind of advantage. Perhaps.

  7. Hypnopottamus says:

    Love this blog. Great articles about EVERYTHING Nokia. The comment sections, however, have deteriorated into little juvenile fanboy banter. Some very immature stuff written here.

  8. yassin says:

    i hope that i’m really interested for it

  9. Anon says:

    I don’t get whats so special.
    They used the phone for 2hours total, ascending descending into the atmosphere.
    Doesn’t any modern smartphone manage that?
    But the polycarbonate is better then aluminum when it’s cold.
    It’s all PR.

  10. s2korpio says:

    … Well. looking at the strong comments here, seems like there are more than a few people that really doesn’t want to see the strengths of Nokia’s Lumia.

    • gabriel9 says:

      Well i don’t mind that Nokia have Windows phones. But i do have issues when MS try to push their OS like it is the only one. I work in IT industry and i know their ways.
      Also there is a matter of choice. I don’t want Windows on my phone but i want Nokia smartphone. And MS do everything to prevent that. Only option i have left is to buy more N9 and use them in future, or go for some Droid. So tell me should i praise MS Lumia after all that? You must have in mind that N9 is better then Lumia. I tried them both. :)

  11. Galaxy s4 says:

    Well that is a quit good article you have right here that make some things easier to deal with thanks you

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