Mexico follows India and Russia to get Nokia 808 PureView

| May 8, 2012 | 121 Replies

There are a few countries already with the Nokia 808 on their Nokia pages suggesting availability there. The only thing it doesn’t properly indicate is when. Well we heard that India and Russia would be one of the first two.

Nokia said they would update us as more countries become available. Next up, it’s Mexico “but this will occur some weeks later.”

http://conversaciones.nokia.com/2012/05/07/ya-comenzo-la-distribucion-del-nokia-808-pureview/

Cheers Dave for the tip!

Category: Nokia

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Hey, thanks for reading my post. My name is Jay and I'm a medical student at the University of Manchester. When I can, I blog here at mynokiablog.com and tweet now and again @jaymontano. We also have a twitter and facebook accounts @mynokiablog and  Facebook.com/mynokiablog. Check out the tips, guides and rules for commenting >>click<< Contact us at tips(@)mynokiablog.com or email me directly on jay[at]mynokiablog.com

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  1. Arun says:

    I love the bokeh effect in Pureview 808! They should promote that feature a lot more, it’s probably the first mobile phone capable of producing that effect naturally!

    • Isaac says:

      No. The N8 was the first! check out http://www.flickr.com/nokian8photography for some untouched bokeh lovin’ :D

    • Javier says:

      Defocus blur (“bokeh” refers more to the aesthetic quality of the defocused circles) requires 1. a wide lens aperture that allows more non-parallel light rays to come in, 2. a large sensor area. It can be observed mostly when there is a large distance between the plane that is in focus and the other objects appearing in the image. The main reason why it is does not appear in mobile phones (aside from extreme close-ups) is the small size of the sensor. Since the N8 and now the 808 have larger sensors, only they can achieve this pleasant defocus effect. In fact the 1/1.2in diagonal of the 808 is not far from the size of the new Nikon 1 interchangeable lens camera system, that is why it is so amazing!

  2. trojan_mouse says:

    I envy them!:( How I wish I can go there! I hope it’s coming in the Philippines!

    • Ulysses says:

      The 808 is not on Nokia PH’s products page whereas the Lumia 900 is. So the odds are… no 808 for Philippines. But one should never stop hoping.

      • trojan_mouse says:

        I’ve been checking their website but I haven’t seen any sign of 808! I hope I can find it in Greenhills!

    • zymesh says:

      i need an upgrade to my n8! Nokia PH will fail if they keep pushing Lumias here. They should get the market of people buying entry level DSLR with kit lens. Its a fad here since late 2011 to own a DSLR even if you dont know sh*t in taking pictures. im seeing a lot of DSLR owners using flash and doesnt use the power of the sensor and lens on taking good and better pictures without flash. They are using it like a freaking point and shoot with a grin of “im a pro photog guy”! WTF

  3. JD! says:

    In india, Nokia has removed all new Symbian phones 500, 600 and 701 from their advts. But surprisingly they are showing old phones like N8, E7 but in the center is shining LUMIA… LOL.
    Guess some things can never change… ;-)

    • manu says:

      i hadnt seen any advertising for a symbian phone since N8 and E7.they hadnt given any promotion to their 2011 symbian line.there are a fleets of lumia to try out at nokia priority,but not even a single belle based device.worse they dont even have a dummy of it

      • Shriek says:

        Well if Nokia wants to dig their grave in India so badly let them do it.

        Yup after the E7 and N8 i havent seen any major Symbian ads. You know in mumbai there is even an offer where you can buy a Lumis phone and if you dont like it you can return it for a full refund.

        • lordstar says:

          Same here in the Philippines, Nokia ph never really promoted the belle devices. Maybe one reason that contributed to the steep decline in sales for Symbian is the lack of promotion?

  4. Georg says:

    Next up: Paraguay, Angola and Pitcairn Island.
    Ok, Nokia is an international company more than HTC and such, but selling in these markets before places where the industry pace is set is….stupid. Or maybe they don’t want to be successful with this, N9-like.

    • Prasenjit Singh Bist says:

      india is their biggest market….

    • manu says:

      india and russia are two big market with some love for symbian still left

      • Janne says:

        This is an important point. Nokia is clearly aiming at markets where Symbian was still selling okay. Very little point in trying to hit the head in the wall in western markets where nothing Symbian sells in any significant quantity.

        • Ulysses says:

          Agreed. Think Symbian never got any love from the Operators in the US to begin with so am not surprised that Nokia has given them the bird with respect to 808. To be honest, if the Operators wanted they could jolly well pay to get the 808 on their portfolio but I don’t think they are interested. As it is, they waited till the Lumias to give Nokia a leg up in the market. So Yeap!

  5. Derek says:

    Interesting how with Symbian and the n9 they announced it and we had to wait months before we can get it but with lumia the wait is much less

    • Paul Grenfell says:

      Elop has bet the family Jewels on Lumia..Which is fine by me, but he sold of the Symbian Customer base in the process..

    • HappyN9User says:

      Aren’t you familiar with the new Nokia Business Strategy? If a product gets any awards, they won’t sell it. If it gets “meh… it’s… ok, I guess” reviews, they will sell it everywhere and spend millions and millions to advertise it.

      I think it’s a great strategy. Working amazingly everyday!

      • Derek says:

        Unfortunately I am familiar with it. Hence why for some stupid reason Elop said USA isn’t getting the N9 so I have an Australian version with warranty in Australia.

        • 101 says:

          now thats truly amazing

          • Deaconclgi says:

            Just as amazing as the fact that I’m in the US and will probably get a PureView from Mexico with a Mexican warranty….atleast Mexico is closer to me. Maybe I’ll drive down for a warranty repair! lol

            Sad times being a Nokia user when you have to go to extremes just to get a product that you like.

  6. hhallian says:

    No podía quedarse México atrás Seguramente lo traerá Telcel la compañía de Carlos Slim el hombre más rico del mundo A perfect companion to my Galaxy Note

  7. Eric says:

    if that´s true even the nokia workers in mexico will be surprized; i recently have sopoken with a guy from nokia mexico, and till the last week, they only know that the 808 will arrive but, posibly till september- december, but if you consider that the 603 launch was almost a secret (and not even you can see any more sponsors than the lumia and asha family) is posible that it came soon

  8. gordonH says:

    Too soon to count on the news just yet… Elop doesn’t want any competition to Lumnia.
    Here’s to hoping the 808 gets a fair “trial”.

    • Janne says:

      Oh come on. If Elop wanted to sabotage the 808 PureView, he could have stopped it dead in its tracks and not release it at all. Maybe with the N9 the argument could still be makde that “it was too far along to be killed” around Feb11, but I’m quite sure the 808 PureView Elop could have killed had he wanted to.

      It is the country organisations that are choosing which markets think they can sell the 808 PureView in sufficient numbers to justify it. And of course the big marketing goes behind the big strategy, which is Lumia and Asha. Unfortunately due to the transition, the 808 PureView is part of the legacy strategy. Let’s be happy it does come out at all, in my opinion.

      Sames goes for the N9 as well, I think. Elop could very likely have killed it had he wanted to really sabotage it. But instead I can see they want these products out in certain markets because it makes business sense there, and not in others where it would make too little business sense.

      • Doffen says:

        Nokia has exactly one phone that I have some interest in – the Nokia 808. If this phone is not available then I go somewhere else. Great strategy, must be the work of a real genious.

        • Janne says:

          Yes, because merits of the whole strategy are to be judged by your interest or lack there of? :)

          We all know what the strategy is and why they are executing it the way they do.

          Some agree, some disagree, some love, some hate, most of (including me) something in between.

          Let’s enjoy the 808. It is a small world, if it isn’t coming to your hoods, just order online.

          • yasu says:

            “Yes, because merits of the whole strategy are to be judged by your interest or lack there of?”

            Of course not. I don’t know if you have noticed, but *millions* have already left the building, hence since Q2 2011 Nokia has posted €2.85B of losses, and counting.

            • Janne says:

              yasu: Obviously my response was to his comment that 808 is the only Nokia device that interests him. And my response to that, in longer form, is that I get it. It is unfortunate. But also that for a number of other reasons, be they good or bad, that is not the only thing Nokia is considering – the other is, how to best play their cards to win. In that grand scheme what an individual user or what near-term results are may not be the deciding factor. And we both agree the Symbian transition was botched, however now that it is what it is, I’m not so sure Nokia would be wise to get head over heels trying to sell the 808 in markets that have already increasingly said no to Symbian. Maybe it is just better to let Symbian slide into oblivion faster there than to continue associating Nokia with that. Or maybe not, this is just me rambling.

              We have gone through all the arguments relating to that a thousand times, and the strategy is still what it is.

              • yasu says:

                I’m just pointing out that Nokia financials point towards Doffen being right.

                P.S. : There is no “Symbian transition”. There is a Nokia transition from Symbian to Windows Phone which is so far, according to Nokia financials, failing, no ifs or buts about it.

                • Janne says:

                  yasu:

                  “I’m just pointing out that Nokia financials point towards Doffen being right.”

                  I seriously doubt that. They may point out the failure to keep Symbian up, but whatever Nokia does with a niche product like the 808 is completely irrelevant to their overall fiscal performance. To think otherwise to be bordering delusional. Now, N9, maybe done differently they could have sold more of those and helped the current numbers.

                  “There is no “Symbian transition”. There is a Nokia transition from Symbian to Windows Phone which is so far, according to Nokia financials, failing, no ifs or buts about it.”

                  You and I both know what we mean, why split hairs. I call it “Symbian transition”, you call it “Nokia transition from Symbian to Windows Phone”. We both mean the same thing.

                  And as far as I know, I disagreed with the way the transition was handled right after Feb11 and right after the latest fiscals called risks realized, transition failed. So no need to preach me. It was a gamble and they lost that battle. I have been clear in my condemnation.

                  Have they lost the war? I hope not. In the grand scheme of things the 808 – a niche product no matter what – is pretty insignificant, what now matters to them is ramping up Lumia and Asha. Until that happens, they will keep hurting, but no realistic amount of 808s sold will change that.

                  • yasu says:

                    @Janne

                    “I seriously doubt that. They may point out the failure to keep Symbian up, but whatever Nokia does with a niche product like the 808 is completely irrelevant to their overall fiscal performance. To think otherwise to be bordering delusional. Now, N9, maybe done differently they could have sold more of those and helped the current numbers.”

                    It’s not about individual users and individual handset models. It’s about Nokia making it difficult to its user base to buy products they would be willing to buy, for the sake of some products that they seemingly aren’t that interested in buying, despite million dollars in advertising and promotion. So far, Nokia financials tell me, that it’s a wrong strategy. So far, four consecutive quarters of losses amounting do €2.85B.

                    The shit is already rolling up the hill to Elop, if things continue that way, they will roll up to the board.

                    (…)

                    “Have they lost the war?”

                    They did the day they capitulated. It’s now Google, Apple and far behind Microsoft. It’s the so-called War Of Ecosystems, remember?

                    • Janne says:

                      yasu:

                      Let me start by saying I respect your differing opinion on Feb11 and “capitulation”. I disagree, but I can appreciate there are valid reasons to think otherwise too. That is understood.

                      Now, to letting people buy what they want, two points:

                      - The new strategy being what it is, it would arguably be bad for Symbian to cannibalize Nokia’s Lumia efforts. All manufacturers with many different product-lines try to minimize cannibalization. So they must think about this.

                      - It must make fiscal sense to sell a product in certain market, since there is cost associated with bringing a product to a certain market. Local Nokia subsidiaries, in the case of 808, are quite likely deciding themselves if this limit is exceeded or not.

                      Now both are very much arguable, where to put the limit, what to decide, how much is controlled from the top, what decisions are local, but all are very common business decisions. At the very least I don’t think the word sabotage applies, that some have thrown around.

                    • yasu says:

                      @Janne
                      Elop declared War Of Ecosystems. Since then, it’s all about Microsoft’s. Is that open to debate?

                      “The new strategy being what it is, it would arguably be bad for Symbian to cannibalize Nokia’s Lumia efforts. All manufacturers with many different product-lines try to minimize cannibalization. So they must think about this”

                      Yeah, it’s better than a potential Nokia sales goes to the competition if the prospective buyer isn’t interested in WP. It makes perfect Elopian sense. And you wonder why people throw trojan horse and sabotage around.

                      The financial results are here to speak about the soundness of those business decisions.

                    • Janne says:

                      yasu:

                      Soundness is another question. :) I never said they were sound… in fact I have disagreed with many of the transitional decisions made. No doubt those have contributed negatively too. But sabotage is too strong a word in my opinion. There are the two angles too, that I pointed out in my previous message. There is some merit to those as well. We can agree to disagree on this, of course.

                      As for the larger debate, let’s not open the rest of the can of worms, we can agree to disagree on that too. :)

      • James says:

        Why stop it dead in it’s tracks, that would be dumb.
        There’s MANY subtle ways to ‘dampen’ the success of a device, to the advantage of another.
        I think you’re well aware of most (if not all) of them.
        Pointless outlining it all, you reject that possibility constantly anyway.

        • Dave says:

          Plenty of devices never make it to market, and the 808 could have been killed more than a year ago and you’d never even know about it. For all you know, they did kill the 82MP version running Meego.

          It’s silly to expect others to continuously disprove your conspiracy theories. It’s up to you to make some non convulated argument that Elop is a crazy mad man at the head of Nokia with the power to control everything while 40000 Nokia drones follow orders without leaking things like “we were about to release the 808 worldwide, since the famous worldwide Symbian marketshare was never about cheap crappy S60v5 devices but about 500 euro flagships but then ELOP killed it”, except we don’t.

          Some markets focus on different product lines. That’s business.

        • Janne says:

          But why would he do that? I mean, I can accept that at some level for the N9 (and did at the time people had this debate last time over the N9), that it was too far along to stop – but Feb11 was over a year prior to the 808 announcement.

          Why not just stop the 808, if the reason is to sabotage? Nobody knew about it outside of Nokia – and therefore probably very few knew about it inside Nokia?

          Had he been the evil mastermind you seem to think he is, Elop could have waited to bring in this technology in a Windows Phone and show the world what great stuff Windows Phone enabled them to do.

          Why didn’t he do that? That would have been the ultimate sabotage. Instead he went on even highlighting the product in his AGM presentation, it was the major news out of MWC and they will sell this product very soon in many, many places.

          I can accept N9 was too far along for Elop to realistically stop, possibly (I don’t think so necessarily but I can accept it is possible). But why didn’t he stop the 808? He could have, definitely could have.

          You are going to have to try harder to put this in the sabotage column.

          • Madratz says:

            Nokia desperately needed to bring out the N9 and 808 to showcase their ‘still in the game’ technology wise. That doesn’t mean they want them to be successful.

            Its like saying, “Yes our current Lumia lines are mediocre but its not our fault cause Microsoft set the rules before we came. Here, look at our N9 and PureView 808 winning award after awards. Just wait for WP Apollo where we will intergrate our software in imaging and design expertise into WP and then we are really playing with big boys”.

            So, no Janne.. I’m afraid your argument on Elop could have killed the the N9 and 808 if he wanted to sabotage this product doesn’t hold water at this point. He need to ensure them out to market….crippled.

            • Janne says:

              Madratz:

              “So, no Janne.. I’m afraid your argument on Elop could have killed the the N9 and 808 if he wanted to sabotage this product doesn’t hold water at this point. He need to ensure them out to market….crippled.”

              Now, this, I give you is possible. Hardly conclusive proof to put it in certain terms like you said, but I can certainly believe this could be a reason.

              On the other hand…

              “Yes our current Lumia lines are mediocre but its not our fault cause Microsoft set the rules before we came. Here, look at our N9 and PureView 808 winning award after awards. Just wait for WP Apollo where we will intergrate our software in imaging and design expertise into WP and then we are really playing with big boys.”

              If this is how Elop would put it, Iwould actually a very, very hard to disagreeing with him. That is actually the essence, the core of the whole Lumia strategy in my eyes. What Nokia must do, what they can do, what they will do – and with what they will succeed if at all. To me that would sound like a plausible strategy bet, instead of sabotage.

              Well put, theoretical Elop! :)

              • Janne says:

                Typo: “If this is how Elop would put it, Iwould actually a very, very hard to disagreeing with him.” => “If this is how Elop would put it, I would actually have a very, very hard to disagreeing with him.”

          • James says:

            Again, you two are completely misconstruing what I said.
            Either purposefully or inadvertently, who knows.
            I didn’t say anything like “sabotage”…

            Most of the subtle things I was referring to.
            Are fairly normal business practices when you’re bringing a new line in, & trying to leverage it above one you’ve deemed deprecated.

            All am saying is, call it as that, don’t try to paint it as:
            Oh x is just a shittier device, it couldn’t have had a future, that’s why it’s selling hugely worse than y now.

            That is hugely simplistic & utterly misleading.
            And is constantly done by the WP-only’ers here.
            Anyway, couldn’t give a shit, carry-on gimps.

            • Dave says:

              “Oh x is just a shittier device, it couldn’t have had a future, that’s why it’s selling hugely worse than y now.”

              Nobody is badmouthing the 808, nobody is saying WP is better, nobody is complaining it ships with a dead OS or shouldn’t be shipped at all. Not a single person who likes WP said anything negative in the comments here,

              until

              YOU guys who keep dragging everything back to the usual Nokia is daying Elop is a mole WP is evil blah blah.

              Look in the mirror before calling anyone gimps.

              • James says:

                Oh calm down, gimp was tongue-in-cheek.
                In reference to the debate as-a-whole & those (inc. me) partaking.
                Besides….
                You’re the one that was rude initially, look at your 1st response to mine.

                Silly, conspiracy theories, convoluted, it goes on.
                And I hadn’t even outlined in-depth what I was saying.
                You just assumed you knew what I meant.

                And you’re arguably the saddest kind of gimp.
                Because you’re casting things like it’s all one side behaving terribly.
                Please…..

                People that don’t agree with the WP-only strat. (we’ve no choice really now anyway).
                If I see them say something flat-out wrong, I correct it.
                Plenty of others like that….
                They don’t exist only on your allegedly more “virtuous” side.

                Now I’ll wait for the expectant:
                “Yes but there’s more virtuous people on our side of the debate” response.”
                O.M.G….

                • Dave says:

                  “Silly, conspiracy theories, convoluted, it goes on.”

                  Isn’t that the theme? So far I can not recall a single acknowledgement that maybe the purpose of the WP strategy is _not_ in fact to squander Nokia to Microsoft. Or even that maybe WP _is_ a pleasant product, and that the BoD is following this strategy because they actually believe it to be best for business. If anyone is going to claim otherwise, the burden of proof falls on them. You are very well aware of the tone of messages here, I am sure.

                  The 808 is a very expensive device, with a very specific, though rare, appeal. Unlike the N9, it is much harder to come up with a sound reason why they wouldn’t want to sell it other than that they simply believe the local customizations and investments needed are not justified by the expected response.

                  The 808 sells because of the camera, not because of the OS.

                  “And you’re arguably the saddest kind of gimp.”

                  Sure James. There are as many hit and run “WP rules Symbian sucks” posts as there are hit and run “Symbian rules WP sucks” posts. Are we reading the same comments?

                  • Janne says:

                    Dave:

                    “Isn’t that the theme? So far I can not recall a single acknowledgement that maybe the purpose of the WP strategy is _not_ in fact to squander Nokia to Microsoft. Or even that maybe WP _is_ a pleasant product, and that the BoD is following this strategy because they actually believe it to be best for business. If anyone is going to claim otherwise, the burden of proof falls on them. You are very well aware of the tone of messages here, I am sure.”

                    Well put Dave. That, I guess, what many of us are trying to say to counter the “sabotage” themed venom. Nokia has made their case, they have publicized their strategy and are now following it. There are some unfortunate consequences to that, sure, but there is also the goal they are working towards. Agree or disagree (and I get it, many disagree), they think it is the best for Nokia, and very much still do, that much was clear from the Nokia AGM. The effort chairman Ollila spent on underlining how much they trust in Elop and the management team was extraordinary. It left no room for questions. Absolute trust that this is the best strategy and this is the thing that they believe will turn the ship around by year’s end.

                    It may fail of course, but it is much more than Elop just spinning his yarn. There is a whole management team and board behind this decision. Very few people at the higher echelons of Nokia have changed after Feb11.

                  • James says:

                    My point was the semantics of who does it more is a red-herring.*
                    It’s merely used as a way to somehow debase everyone represented in that group.
                    Which is not fair AT ALL…
                    Discussion should be focused on the points individuals from each of those groups are making.
                    Nothing more, nothing less…
                    Points which I made clear from the outset I CBF’d making in any huge detail.

                    *And aside fromm that it’s patently obvious you’re going to have more Symbian/meego user making those sort of comments.
                    The same would be entirely true if it was WP users in the same position instead.

                    • Janne says:

                      James: It is certainly true that discussion should be between individuals and not labels or groups that may not represent the individual opinions. I agree. Yet this is a problem on all sides of this argument, people throwing around labels that really don’t fit. It is unfortunate, I agree. But it is also quite hard to avoid, I’d recommend just taking the time to use a sentence or two to explain your position and forgive others for mistakes.

                      “*And aside fromm that it’s patently obvious you’re going to have more Symbian/meego user making those sort of comments.
                      The same would be entirely true if it was WP users in the same position instead.”

                      Probably. But whomever, I think it is time to wind it down. Enough is enough. And I guess one problem for people like me and Dave is that your comments seem to, even if they aren’t, but seem to defend that group that trolls here – or at least blames just people like Dave and perhaps I of venom, when most of the venom comes from the Symbian/MeeGo side of the fence. It feels wrong and thus you may get grouped into that because you direct your response to only one “side” of the debate. Certainly that happens to all of us, I am often seen as some kind of Windows-only Elop-defender, when that really isn’t true.

                      Just some explanations. No point really.

            • Janne says:

              James:

              “Again, you two are completely misconstruing what I said.
              Either purposefully or inadvertently, who knows.”

              Probably completely inadvertently. I’m having these conversations with dozens of people, over and over again, and truth be told it all gets very blurry to me very fast. :) So don’t take the “sabotage” word to literally or directed at you. But definitely many people here call this sabotage by Elop. I agree you did not in your message above and apologies if my reply was mistaken in that regard.

              “Most of the subtle things I was referring to.
              Are fairly normal business practices when you’re bringing a new line in, & trying to leverage it above one you’ve deemed deprecated.”

              I agree that there is a fine line to be walked in instances like this. On one hand, they must try to sell current products, but also sell future products which depend on a new ecosystem completely separate from the old products. (One major downside of the current strategy, of course it has upsides to counter.)

              “All am saying is, call it as that, don’t try to paint it as:
              Oh x is just a shittier device, it couldn’t have had a future, that’s why it’s selling hugely worse than y now.”

              But then I don’t really think this is what Nokia is saying. A lot people are saying Elop is sabotaging and misleading sales figures, when I don’t really think he cares that much if N9 or Symbian outsells Lumia. They were, after all, still going to sell 150 million more Symbians by 2016 after Feb11. He predicted it himself. I’m sure he’d love to reach that goal he himself put out there. It is the critics that claim Elop is somehow saying Symbian is doing so poorly now, it must be replaced with Lumia, when I don’t think Elop has ever used Symbian sales figures to excuse anything (other than in the latest earnings report say that they can’t make their 150 million goal and thus must try harder with Lumia instead).

              Elop used other reasons, and we have gone them over and over again, to explain why Feb11 was required. Other than keeping people moving to the new ecosystem, I don’t think any good Symbian salesfigures are really threatening him. Why would they? Ah yes, the Microsoft conspiracy. But conspiracies aside, I’m sure Elop would have rather not had to do the earnings warning. I’m sure he would like to keep selling Symbian steadily while also moving people over to Windows Phone steadily. It is delusional to think that he cares if 808 PureView outsells Lumia or not, not only is that quite near impossible for a niche device like that, but if he thought he could do it – I think he might try even. To get to that 150 million. To stabilise their cash. But personally I think they are just seeing more and more markets and local subsidiaries simply reject Symbian, because it is no longer competitive.

              Unless you believe the Microsoft conspiracy, there is no logical reason for Elop to want 808 PureView to do badly. It just isn’t a realistic threat to the Lumia strategy. Sure, I agree he must walk a fine line so that the 808 isn’t cannibalizing Lumia (that would be bad overall because Lumia is the future), so I certainly give you guys that, but I think the sabotage talk overall has gone way overboard.

              “That is hugely simplistic & utterly misleading.
              And is constantly done by the WP-only’ers here.
              Anyway, couldn’t give a shit, carry-on gimps.”

              I don’t really think it is, though. Who here says Symbian’s current performance is indicative of Lumia strategy being needed? Maybe one or two persons at most. Most of us would love it for the 808 to sell 10 million. I know I would. But when I see talk of sabotage when the logical explanation is simply normal, global business planning, I try to put in my word to the contrary.

              • James says:

                Sorry Janne,
                No time for walls of text…

                • Dave says:

                  Next time you post anything, add a line at the top “Not interested in your opinion, just spewing my venom” so others don’t waste their own time with you either.

                  • arts says:

                    that it seems like the norm around here.

                  • James says:

                    Venom, really?
                    You’re the one that started with that.
                    Pot meet kettle…
                    I was quite clear I didn’t want to get into a lengthy debate w/my 1st post.
                    I’m not bound to, doesn’t make my point any less weighty.
                    Just don’t have time to tinker away on the keys, too bad for you.

                    • Janne says:

                      James:

                      “I’m not bound to, doesn’t make my point any less weighty.”

                      Of course it does make them less weighty, but I agree you are not bound to do anything.

                      My rebuttal stands as the last words on that apparently.

                    • James says:

                      “Of course it does make them less weighty, but I agree you are not bound to do anything.
                      My rebuttal stands as the last words on that apparently.”

                      That’s okay, I’m comfortable with that.
                      Relative to a wall-of-text w/little to no substance, it doesn’t lose a great deal of mass, if any.

                    • Janne says:

                      Yes, one final insult there. Great. ;) I give it to you, you really had the last word.

                    • James says:

                      Please & yours wasn’t???
                      Yours are just more passive/aggressive.
                      I usually prefer to be straight-up.
                      At least I said there’s some substance, I gave you that much.

                      Look I could address your post point-by-point if I wanted.
                      But in-the-end why bother?
                      Is it going to change anything?
                      Not likely, it’s just a huge time waster.

                    • Janne says:

                      James: I think there was understanding to be added, nor do I think I was unreceptive to your points. But water under the bridge.

                    • James says:

                      @Janne
                      Ditto & no hard feelings.
                      Just no time to waste…

              • lordstar says:

                Aah that 150m more symbian devices to sell goal of elop/higher ups

                Haha leak the burning platform memo and announce the eol on symbian and then tell the public that we still have 150m more symbian devices to sell.

                That was one hell of a mismanagement.

      • Sonny says:

        elop didnt have a choice too release the n9 and pureview. you know why? what other products would he have sold if he killed the n9 or 808? geez stop defending elop for this crap their trying to pull! just tell me what would be so wrong if they released both the lumia’s and the 808 pureview?

  9. Elop killed MeeGo says:

    Next country is Afghanistan.

  10. torcida says:

    What about GERMANY!?!?!?

  11. Waqas Ahmad Khan says:

    It seems Pakistan is also among the those getting 808.
    See link here:

    http://propakistani.pk/2012/05/08/nokia-to-hold-a-global-handset-launch-event-in-pakistan/

  12. Waqas Ahmad Khan says:

    Their is a bit of confusion in my mind to this point of time in respect of 808 for Pakistan. Any guess Admin??? or anyone??? what could those handsets be, which are being launched globally (including Pakistan)on 15th of May?

    http://propakistani.pk/2012/05/08/nokia-to-hold-a-global-handset-launch-event-in-pakistan/

  13. torcida says:

    Amazon UK says: This item is due to be released on May 31, 2012.

  14. Janne says:

    All the business logic and discussion aside, for purely PR reasons personally I would have sold both the N9 and 808 everywhere. No marketing if it does not make sense, but orderable items if nothing else. They were/are good halo products.

    But then I don’t know what kind of costs and reasons Nokia had to deal with.

    • NobleScarlet says:

      Honestly, if Nokia spent the same amount for marketing on the PureView and N9, and release them everywhere, Nokia will really be at the top of the game.

      • Janne says:

        NobleScarlet: I have a hard time seeing how. 808 is a niche product, much more so than N8 was at the time. It is just so large and heavy while phones have gotten thinner and thinner. It is an important product no doubt, but not a Nokia savior as is. N9 of course was more mainstream, but who knows what kind of an ecosystem Nokia could have built for it. But we’ll never know, of course.

        • gordonH says:

          will we ever know? oohh will we ever know.
          Sabotage?

        • Sonny says:

          have you seen on the web how many people will by this phone? there’s more more nokia users that will buy this phone then a lumia! I would be interested to see how much people here would buy this phone!

  15. AlsoCan says:

    I for one don’t understand why Nokia releases the 808 at all. It seems completely inconsistent with their business strategy. The N8 is arguably still the king camera phone, they have nothing to prove in the market and competitors are still years behind. They could have comfortably waited one year to release the technology on Lumias and still generate the same amount of awe about a 41 MP camera.

    Releasing the 808 is even more incomprehensible when they don’t seem prepared to promote it or distribute it widely. Why bother at all if they’re only prepared to sell it in small quantities?

    On the other hand, having PureView or polycarbonate design exclusive to Lumias would have considerably improved their (currently very low) appeal – why waste that in exchange of few 808 or N9 sales?

    My guess is that it must only be due to some internal politics (e.g. PureView team may have left), or maybe some legal commitments with suppliers or third parties…

    Don’t get me wrong, I’ll be the first in line to buy the 808, and I absolutely disprove the WP strategy. I don’t see the 808 as a “niche” product and I am sure it would easily oversell the 900 if priced reasonably and given half the marketing. If anything, I consider the cold and dry WP interface as a much more “niche” feature than the presence of the camera bump. I just don’t understand the business strategy behind the 808 launch (and the N9′s)…

  16. lordstar says:

    I think the 808 is too far along to stop as well. Isn’t it 5 years in the making? That would really upset the imaging team of Nokia if Elop would have just cancelled the device and ordered them to go make the tehnology be available for windows phone.

    • pipo says:

      exactly. And to please mr. Dinning the lead on the project he agreed to ‘sell it in selected markets’. Which means markets where it wouldn’t hurt sales of the upcomming Lumia 900.

      The bloody bastards.
      Of Nokia doesn’t go full ahead with this then they deserved to burn in hell!

  17. Sonny says:

    can anyone tell me here if the 808 isn’t on nokias product page of your country but the lumia 900 isn’t also will that country get it? I’m from South Africa and neither the 808 of the lumia 900 is on their product page. thanks!

  18. Rustyknight17 says:

    Janne , u might be surprised at how well the 808 might do if released in all markets ! After all , it attracted a LOT of attention and positive press at CES 2012 !
    Hmmm , if Amazon USA doesn`t carry the PureView , might have to make a trip to Mexico lol !

  19. Rustyknight17 says:

    And U will notice that Elop was nowhere to be found at the 808`s intro . Undoubtedly , the reason it ( and the N9 ) haven`t been released in several key markets is because Elop correctly saw Symbian and Meego as major threats to WP !

  20. steelicon says:

    IMO Nokia : Let the CONSUMERS decide and vote WITH THEIR HARD EARNED MONEY whether they WANT the Nokia 808 PV or not.

    Release it globally. As a sign of good faith. Nokia, if you do that, we will respect your decision going with WP. If not, then a whole load of sh*tstorm is REALLY COMING YOUR WAY.

    The public has spoken. Heed.

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