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Windows Phone rises to 32% of sales in Finland, catching up to Android on 36%

| September 4, 2012 | 20 Replies

Earlier today we glanced at statcounter details for Finland. Something we often note is that this shows all phones in use (via browser and thus extrapolated marketshare), and NOT current sales. This means that gains in marketshare with relatively small percentages might actually indicate larger overall percentage of current sales given that there is little to no userbase for WP prior to Lumia.

http://gs.statcounter.com/#mobile_os-FI-monthly-201202-201209

Janne found an article from Iltalehti.fi reporting that currently, Windows Phone has risen to 32% in Finland (also note, Finland’s population is quite small). Android is slightly ahead at 36%. Given how recent Lumia’s introduction was to Finland vs Android/iOS, that’s not too bad.

http://www.iltalehti.fi/digi/2012090416039779_du.shtml

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Finland is a very interesting market since it is the land of Nokia. People do have a sense of loyalty towards the Finnish brand but they are also open to phones from other manufacturers using other OSes, actively choosing the non home grown OS since at least 2009 (possibly 2008, but there is no data before this).

Statcounter makes a note that from April it stopped including S40 into Symbian.

Quite correctly, global marketshare is quite modest. Sadly what happens in Finland is not immediately the same in the rest of the world (they have growth but very modest…well except Brazil). But come Q4, things may finally start working out for Nokia, what with new WP8 Lumias and potentially hundreds of millions of expected new W8 users getting accustomed to Metro.

 

Cheers Janne for the tip

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Category: Nokia, Windows Phone

About the Author ()

Hey, thanks for reading my post. My name is Jay and I'm a medical student at the University of Manchester. When I can, I blog here at mynokiablog.com and tweet now and again @jaymontano. We also have a twitter and facebook accounts @mynokiablog and  Facebook.com/mynokiablog. Check out the tips, guides and rules for commenting >>click<< Contact us at tips(@)mynokiablog.com or email me directly on jay[at]mynokiablog.com
  • Janne

    I believe the 32% was for the month of June, as was the 36% Android figure.

    • Janne

      What is interesting is that according to StatCounter July was an even steeper raise than June, I wonder what the marketshare was there. For August and September, clearly, I expect it to drop due to WP8.

    • Pökö

      Yes, Lumia really has gained ground here in Finland. You see wp -phones everywhere. Haven’t yet seen Lumia phones in my workplaces option list.
      I think we are seeing some significant growth still within business users.

    • Guest

      A while back on swedish swedish tv they talked about WP marketshare in the world and Finland, and they said that the marketshare in Finland isn’t much of a surprise since 1 out of 4 finns owns shares in Nokia.
      Now i don’t know if it’s true or not but if it is it should be taken in consideration when looking at the marketshare in Finland.
      That said, it’s good to see Nokia still selling smartphones in some markets.

      • Just me

        From Finland i can say that i don’t know one person who owns shares in Nokia. Nokia shares is not like the Swedish telia when they started to sell shares as “peoples shares”.

        When reading finnish newspapers i read hate against nokia in 2/3 news, maybe because of elop or because so many people lost their jobs.

        • Janne

          To me too every fourth person sounds too much. Maybe one in ten would fit better with my experiences.

          I’m actually pretty surprised Lumia is selling that well in Finland considering the perception of Nokia in recent years. Symbian’s reputation really brought them low first and then the transition and all the layoffs in people’s eyes.

          • Marc Aurel

            Even Symbian was still selling rather well in 2010 as the stats show, even though the trend was downwards. Ironically the Symbian downtrend probably also includes a general shift from feature phones to smartphones in 2010, since Series 40 was included in Symbian by Stat counter and many S40 phones became preloaded with Opera Mini (this was before Nokia launched the Series 40 Nokia browser). Before April 2012 all those were counted as “Symbian”… It is quite impossible to say what was the total impact of that and it pretty much makes all StatCounter numbers about Symbian before April 2012 dubious for counting actual Symbian market share.

            • http://mynokiablog.com Jay Montano

              Hasn’t S40 been growing in sales?

              • Marc Aurel

                I don’t think so. More like stable sales in unit numbers. In Finland S40 sales have been slowly going down for a long time, first in favor of S60 and then since 2009 other smartphone platforms. Globally Series 40 has gained feature phone market share lately thanks to Asha, but we have to remember that feature phone market is now shrinking, because smartphones eat their market share faster than the global mobile phone market is growing.

  • twig

    I love Finland.

  • Bosh

    All those Symbian fanboys!! Blaming Elop, HA! Look at the second chart and see Symbian going down since 2009.

    All that is before the February 11th 2011 leaked memo, so Symbian actually sucked ass before Elop came to Nokia.

    For all REAL Nokia fanboys, let’s hope tomorrow they annonce a “disrupting” (for the good) device :)

    • NULL

      Symbian fanboys? Meh.

      I just hate to see so many people (unwittingly?) buying such a ultra-closed down platform, with very limited interoperability. As if it is an unavoidable fact of life whenever companies like microsoft, apple, facebook (and yes, Nokia) pull yet another stunt which limits *your* phone even more. Remember: if an app isn’t in the store, you *cannot* install it, even if you want to.

      • migo

        It’s better to have competition among various platforms than to have one closed and one open platform.

        FirefoxOS is going to be really open, and we’ll see if openWebOS goes anywhere, so there’s some small competition for Android in the ‘open’ area, and Windows Phone provides competition to iOS in the closed market (which some prefer as well), along with the upcoming BB10.

        At the moment I care more about the hardware performance of the phone, which is why I’ve been either buying Nokia or BlackBerry for a long time. After that it’s stability, which WP was really the best for (although that could swing back to BlackBerry with BB10, given how stable the PlayBook is – with the latest update I haven’t had to reboot it once).

        Once stability and the most important features are covered, then apps become a factor. WP suits Nokia fine, and the control MS has over it keeps Nokia from making some of the same mistakes they made with Symbian (if the primary drivers of Symbian had been Sharp and Fujitsu, the iPhone would have had a much harder time getting a foothold on the market).

        • Marc Aurel

          I think MeeGo and Qt already pretty much showed that Nokia was not going to repeat the errors of S60. No need for MS to keep them on the right track as far as UX development goes. MS of course has top notch developer tools, which Nokia and Qt could not have matched, but a thriving app ecosystem does not necessarily need the best possible developer tools. It needs ‘good enough’ tools (which Qt was) to entice developers and a critical mass of users interested in apps. The WP ecosystem is still severely lacking in the latter department, which people defending the WP ecosystem often forget. There is no ecosystem without sufficient installed base of devices.

          • NULL

            Stability-wise the N9 performs excellent. I haven’t had a single unwanted reboot/crash since I’ve bought it. Currently an uptime of 45 days, basically it’s been up from right after I installed PR1.3.

            MS does have some top notch developers, no doubt. And I too thought that MS, while expensive at times, provides a great experience for both users as developers. But now that I’ve hands-on experience with development using MS tools and platforms I can safely state that having top notch developers doesn’t always lead to top notch products…

  • radu

    Nokia app highlights 2 is out of beta ! I just update it.

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