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Nokia Lumia 900 Reviews from Engadget, Mashable, The Verge and Pocket Now

| April 4, 2012 | 173 Replies

 

The Reviews for the Nokia Lumia 900 are all coming out at once. Go check them out if you have time.

Check out reviews batch 2 and 3:

http://mynokiablog.com/2012/04/04/nokia-lumia-900-reviews-2-from-abc-news-gizmodo-wsj-ars-technica-usa-today-wp-central-and-technobuffalo/

http://mynokiablog.com/2012/04/05/nokia-lumia-900-reviews-3-from-anandtech-bloomberg-gigaom-mobiletechreview-zdnet-slashgear-and-more/

For Engadget, Joseph Volpe with Myriam Joire.

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http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/03/nokia-lumia-900-review/?a_dgi=aolshare_twitter

Peter Pachal for Mashable

http://mashable.com/2012/04/03/nokia-lumia-900-review/

Surprisingly Joshua Topolsky for The Verge (I thought Chris Ziegler would be doing this one being an avid fan of the 900)

http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/3/2921472/lumia-900-review

Adam Lein from PocketNow.

http://pocketnow.com/windows-phone/nokia-lumia-900-review-att

There may be more and I’d really love to give mini summaries but I’m heading off to sleep now. Way, way too tired and another long day tomorrow.

Thanks Alan and Arts for the tips!

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Category: Lumia, Nokia, Windows Phone

About the Author ()

Hey, thanks for reading my post. My name is Jay and I'm a medical student at the University of Manchester. When I can, I blog here at mynokiablog.com and tweet now and again @jaymontano. We also have a twitter and facebook accounts @mynokiablog and  Facebook.com/mynokiablog. Check out the tips, guides and rules for commenting >>click<< Contact us at tips(@)mynokiablog.com or email me directly on jay[at]mynokiablog.com
  • Janne

    What I find ironic, though, is that Nokia has been releasing yesteryears specs – even worse – for years now.

    I guess N95 was pretty much the last thing to be somehow relevant spec-wise. Even the praised N9 went into the yesteryear-category because Nokia’s software was categorically late.

    Many of the people now critiquing Lumia 900 for these specs here on this blog would not do the same for N9 or Symbian devices.

    Having said that, I agree the Lumia family at the moment (like all Mango devices) has yesteryears specs. But today’s fluidity – and they are more fluid than MeeGo and far more fluid than Symbian ever.

    Hopefully with Nokia’s help Apollo will get more variety on hardware specs (looking at you ST-Ericssson). This is clearly an area where Nokia and Microsoft must also excel to win.

    But, heck, at least Lumias are not running ARM11 from half-a-decade ago still like, say, Nokia Belles are.

    • migo

      Yep, this is one of the reasons I said Windows Phone was a better fit for Nokia than Android. With how slow moving Nokia is, Windows Phone at least lets them look good. Compared to other WP manufacturers.

    • Doffen

      That is the main problem with Nokia, Skimping on the hardware specifications and asking premium price. Imagine the N9 with dual core A9 processor or Symbian Belle on A9. I think there would be few complaints about fluidity. With WP Nokia is bound to MS specifications and restrictions. Not much hope to shine with WP apart from physical design. Maybe MS will realize the folly of this approach when WP if WP is still in the lower single digit market position in 6 months time. Nokia in it self seems to be unable to realize that current specifications are necessary to compete at the high end.

      • Janne

        I think you are missing two things:

        1) Symbian’s architectural and codebase limitations meant that it was increasingly hard for Nokia to bring it to new technologies.

        2) Nokia probably understands Microsoft’s limitations very well and is already changing them with Lumia 610, which MS has gone on record saying got its spec due to Nokia. This will change even more by Apollo. There will be differentiation and more modern specs.

        Funny thing is, even with so called ancient specs, Lumia still has the best specs Nokia has ever put in a phone!

        • yasu

          Janne wrote :
          “1) Symbian’s architectural and codebase limitations meant that it was increasingly hard for Nokia to bring it to new technologies.”
          Like PureView? NFC? Pentaband or out of this world tech like proper support for SD cards?

          • Janne

            ARM11. No LTE.

            But PureView is actually very impressive. They had to put a DSP inside the camera hardware to get it to work on the ancient processor architecture! Very nice hardware engineering there.

            Not very flattering towards Symbian, but very impressive work certainly.

            NFC is trivial to implement, not unlike USB.

            • yasu

              “ARM11.”
              There was Cortex A8 support in 2009. I’m sure that if they wanted, they could support other platforms in 2012.

              There are 400 developers twiddling their thumbs at Accenture.

              “No LTE.”
              Symbian supports pentaband radios, I don’t see why it could not support LTE, if there was a will to support it, since after all, there are 400 Symbian OS developers twiddling their thumbs at Accenture.

              If you have technical reasons (with links), I’m interested.

              “But PureView is actually very impressive. They had to put a DSP inside the camera hardware to get it to work on the ancient processor architecture! Very nice hardware engineering there.”
              And lo and behold, they manage to make it world on old, busted and fragile Symbian.

              “Not very flattering towards Symbian, but very impressive work certainly.”
              How so? Isn’t that new tech that is so hard to implement on old, busted and fragile Symbian?

              “NFC is trivial to implement, not unlike USB.”
              And yet Symbian has support for it since 2011, WP on the other hand…

              • arts

                And how do you know the expertise of the 400 devastating that are twiddling their thumbs in accenture? I assume you have either their resume or links to back that up.

                • yasu

                  “And how do you know the expertise of the 400 devastating that are twiddling their thumbs in accenture? I assume you have either their resume or links to back that up.”

                  Between the 400 hundreds of them and the 800 others, they should be able to form a team to implement it, since they have been able to implement radio work before.

                  Janne said that it was too hard to implement new tech on Symbian, I provided examples of some such.

                  • arts

                    Completely besides the point and fails to answer my question.

                    Again to make MY question clearer, What are the expertise of the devs currently located at adventure? Are they radio tech experts?

                    Please answer THIS question.

                    • yasu

                      “Completely besides the point and fails to answer my question.”
                      On the contrary.

                      “Again to make MY question clearer, What are the expertise of the devs currently located at adventure?”
                      Symbian OS development I would believe.

                      “Are they radio tech experts?”
                      The 1200 of them highly unlikey. But some of them I would believe yes. Or how would them expect to support the OS till 2016 if not more?

                      “Please answer THIS question.”

              • migo

                You realise that NFC use is still only a novelty at the moment, and that NFC is coming on LG’s next WP?

                • yasu

                  “You realise that NFC use is still only a novelty at the moment, and that NFC is coming on LG’s next WP?”
                  And?

              • arts

                And one thing, pure view was developed with symbian in mind. And that took five years. Unless of course there is a breakdown given as to what part of the years spend was on making symbian work with pureview.

                Again, links please.

                • yasu

                  “And one thing, pure view was developed with symbian in mind. And that took five years. Unless of course there is a breakdown given as to what part of the years spend was on making symbian work with pureview.

                  Again, links please.”
                  I don’t recall saying anything about breakdown about the years spent. If you have evidence of my saying such, please provide a link of your own.

                  • arts

                    When you countered janne arguement that” is increasingly hard to bring new tech to symbian” with pureview of course I would assume that you mean that you are privy to the work schedules of pureview porting. It looks like you don’t have a clue either.

                    • yasu

                      “When you countered janne arguement that” is increasingly hard to bring new tech to symbian” with pureview of course I would assume that you mean that you are privy to the work schedules of pureview porting.”
                      You would assume wrong.

                      I talked about PureView among of some other new tech that made it to Symbian.

                      “It looks like you don’t have a clue either.”
                      I’m not the one that made the original claim.

                      I just provided example of new tech that made it into old ,busted and fragile Symbian before some other more modern and maintainable platforms.

                      I don’t understand your beef.

              • Janne

                yasu:

                I doubt we can bring this discussion to a level where we could agree, but I will try to give an overall idea as to what I was trying to say. I hear you in the sense that Symbian clearly has unique or rare abilities, which means it must not be impossible to bring them to Symbian.

                BUT my point was not whether or not it was impossible, but at what cost. Sure, Symbian had a year or two ago more employees developing it than probably the competition combined. Huge staff. Also it was older, so it had time to accumulate things whereas things like iOS and WP7 cleared much table to start anew – and hence it has taken time for both to accumulate features.

                The problem with Symbian was never lack of features. It has always been quite feature-complete. What I argue it has been lacking is a modern, easily developable architecture that would make it reasonable to compete with the user experience and technical architectures of things like iOS and Android.

                Even today, Nokia Belle is far from fluid and the browser is what it is. Porting other browsers is not that easy due to the nature of native Symbian code. Sure, Qt apps are nicer to develop, but native code (e.g. making Qt 5 for Symbian) is still as horrible as it once was. Add to this bad management over the years for the code and you have a very buggy and fragile thing to work on.

                This brings me to my final point. I continue to argue that these reasons are behind Nokia not having competitive hardware specs in Symbian and why increasingly each generation it was harder and slower for Symbian to try to keep up.

                Symbian is based on EPOC32, which itself is based on EPOC16… These were originally for 1980s (!) pocket computers with very limited memory. Thus the architecture, coding style and things like that are far different from competition that came from desktop to mobile.

                Ironically, one of the things still holding back WP7 in hardware specs is the reason that it too has mobile legacy like Symbian (from Windows CE). The difference being, it is not a 1980s British Psion legacy like Symbian’s weird shit (trust me, it makes huge difference) – and Microsoft have pretty much started over, completing the revamp with the new desktop-originating multi-core kernel in Windows Phone 8.

                • yasu

                  “I doubt we can bring this discussion to a level where we could agree, but I will try to give an overall idea as to what I was trying to say.”

                  Agreed, we’ll probably have to disagree.

                  “I hear you in the sense that Symbian clearly has unique or rare abilities, which means it must not be impossible to bring them to Symbian.”

                  I’ll go even further, it got some new tech before some more modern, more maintainable OSes.

                  You know, *real world* stuff accomplished, not blogosphere theory as to why it would be too hard/impossible and what have you to do.

                  As they say in French (loosely translated) : when one wants to get rid of his dog, one accuses it of rabies.

                  (…)

                  • Janne

                    Yeah, we just have to agree to disagree on whether the dog had rabies – or it was just pretended to have rabies.

                    But apparently both of us can agree that Symbian is a dog. ;)

    • AlsoCan

      Symbian and Meego make Nokia shine among the competition.
      The same can’t be said about WP as this Lumia demonstrate one more time.

      If someone is after fluidity and apps and ecosystem etc., nothing beats the iPhone. Why *exactly* do you like any of the Lumias over the iPhone?

      On the other hand Symbian can do many things that no other phone can. In the end, we (consumers) are the biggest losers in this WP strategy because with the disappearance of Symbian/Meego we lose choice.

      Do we really need a would-be iPhone? What for? Just to feel different – really? What – wasn’t that already an Apple’s motto few years back?

      • Jay Montano

        Symbian has always been doing things no other phones can. Look back in 2007 when iPhone was introduced precisely what Symbian was doing. Did it help it prevent the growth of iOS and Android by having those features? Why not? Did it make the unique features visible? Accessible? Personable?

        It’s good to have unique abilities, but they must be on a solid foundation of an OS with a simple and easy UI to deliver a great user experience. Unfortunately, Symbian missed the boat on that one, and in that time, iOS and Android bit by bit kept grabbing the features Symbian was unique in (whilst being able to lock in customers with their ecosystem).

    • Shilow

      Eh? N9 didn’t go into yesteryear because of the OS.
      It went into yesteryear because future prospects of the platform were almost completely dead.
      And because hw specs were indeed quite mediocre… (aside for industrial design aspects)

      • Shilow

        “Many of the people now critiquing Lumia 900 for these specs here on this blog would not do the same for N9 or Symbian devices.”

        Because there would’ve been a 3rd maemo6 device out (or at least announced by now) that used the U8500 or OMAP4 SoC.
        But as others have said, WP doesn’t seem to really need it, but it still does add to appeal.

        • manu

          why people complain about windows phone not having multicore coz nokia dropped both meego and symbian to windows phone ,but still similar specced to symbian/meego +all restrictions.also L900 is a 2012 device with 2010 specs.
          When battle quadcore devices is heating up,nokia is still happy with 2 year old specs.ofcourse damn the slow development of win os.

  • Deep Space Bar

    elop is [PROFANITY REMOVED] retard….you complain about apple using sim tray but yet you okay a phone with a sim tray…and mimicking apple like usual now a day…..i’m not stupid but this shows how these ceo’s are psycho

  • kiiwii

    complaint about nokia n9 v.s. lumia 900

    I have a nokia n9. After a “backup” then “restore” setting procedure, the phone is locked with an “Enter security code” interface. But I have never ever set such a security code. Then the phone stucked at this state no mather what possiable code I had tried, even reflashing the Firmware did no use.
    This is a serious OS bug, raised & comformerd by others n9 users on official nokia support website.
    http://discussions.europe.nokia.com/t5/Maemo-and-MeeGo-Devices/Nokia-N9-Security-Code/td-p/1190499/page/2

    Since 2012.3.6, I have contacted nokia china support through 4008800123 for several times. I asked for this requirement, unlock my phone back to functional & retain all my personal data.
    At the beginning, they switched me from regular staff to tech staff, who acted like they couldnot understand what issue I was talking about.
    A manager named DongRan(sound) even rejected my request with the excuse of her “sick leave” at last. She said they cannot guarantee my data, why didn’t I backup with nokia PC suit. Actually, indeed, PC suit dosen’t EVEN have any ability to backup n9 data.
    Nokia china SUGGESTed I go for them to wipe all the phone OS data. Regards to my own data, they said MAY or MAYNOT can be kept !
    This huge nokia OS own bug made me, the user take on all the loss.

    Recently, another nokia phone Lumia 900, an network issue has been confirmed related to OS bug, nokia USA provides 2 method to express their “sorry”, exchange the defected phone for a fixed phone OR get a $100 credit back.
    http://conversations.nokia.com/2012/04/11/putting-people-first/

    Nokia n9 and Lumia 900, both are nokia product, while the n9 has a more serious OS bug, causing much more damage, cannot enen get a proper fix method by nokia, not even a formal apologize!
    So, this is nokia, a well know international corporation, how they treat theirs different product customers of different area of the world ?

    How dare you EVEN say “putting people first”?
    Shame on you nokia.

    Anyone who is going to appeal this shameless company, please join me.
    kiiwii88@me.com

    Spread this, thanks.

    • Shilow

      God knows why you’re posting this here….
      Fixes/workarounds & the root cause for this are well doco’d at TMO.
      I can’t recall where OTTOMH, but I have read through several threads about this before.
      I would strongly recommended doing some careful searching over at TMO.
      I’m 100% certain there’s some very revealing threads there.
      I just can’t recall the detail any more….

      Plus… you can back-up your data with Nokia Link.
      And it’s easy to also get Nokia Suite to work, it’s just not “officially” supported.

      • Shilow

        TMO = talk.maemo.org

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