Nokia Re- Takes Central Park Photoshoot, Lumia 920 Blows Competitors (and Friends) Away!

| September 7, 2012 | 150 Replies

With all the ridiculous controversy about whether or not Nokia faked the photoshoot and videos, Nokia very kindly offered the Verge an exclusive change to reshoot the photos we saw and compare them against the rest. The results truly prove how amazing the 920 is, not only did it blow the iPhone 4s, GS3, HTC One X out of the water but it also very clearly bested even the king of phones; the 808.

Lumia 900: (no surprises that it captured almost absolutely Nothing)

http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/1345056/WP_000007.jpg

Nokia 808 Pureview: (Flash was not delpoyed; Xenon flash it lights up whatever’s close to you and darkens up the rest)

http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/1345040/nokia-808-pureview.jpg

Lumia 920: (Simply amazing!- look at the background details)

http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/1345085/lumia-920-original.jpg

-True the 920 didn’t manage to capture much details when it came to the girls face, but we never expected perfect quality, just amazing night-time photos (and it delivers)!

Head over to the verge to see the rest of the competitors and how badly they failed.

http://www.theverge.com/2012/9/7/3299784/nokia-lumia-920-pureview-camera-hi-res-photos

Thanks for the tip APrasad

Edit- For any one who keeps claiming that even this is staged, or rigged against the 808; here’s a short explanation, the 808 can take pictures at night; but Flash can only be used for taking a picture of a single object, you can’t rely on it to light up the landscape, and increasing the ISO means increasing the shutter time (sorry got my camera basics confused) which makes it difficult to hold the camera steady (the whole point of OIS after all)- and you end up with a blurry mess. Here’s a picture I took with the 808, no flash but with the ISO at 200, Total exposure time = 2.7Sec (try keeping your hand steady for that long)

 

Category: Lumia, Nokia, Symbian, Windows Phone

About the Author ()

Hey, my name's Ali- Currently a fifth (and final) year Dental Student from Chicago; studying in Jordan. I love all sorts of gadgets almost as much as I love my cookies! Be sure to follow my Twitter handle @AliQudsi and Subcribe to my Youtube for the latest videos - no pressure. Thanks.
  • art_vaider

    Why 808 is on auto , right is to choose night mode and wi’ll see result better than 920.

    • Paul Grenfell

      try 1600 +4.. its even better..

    • Tak

      That’s because of the Marketing Bonanza trying to make 920 look like its camera was meaningfully close to 808, which it isn’t. Stabilizer doesn’t make its sensor(ca. third of 808′s sensor size) great. Depending on your needs, it may be enough, but 808 is great.

      • http://thegadgetfreak.net Ajit

        +1

        Nokia has now become a FAIL company with its fake advertisments. Never thought Nokia will become like this.

        Elop is converting Nokia more like himself and Microsoft, bunch of liars….

        • Rob

          Oh please, what is it with you guys who can only see conspiracy everywhere? Of course this device isn’t the 808 – they’ve made clear that it’s a completely different take on creating far improved imaging tech over it’s rivals. You can be assured when they can slimline an 808 style to be light enough to be handled by the OIS PureView technology then everyone will stop whining about being ‘ripped off’ or Nokia ‘dumbing down’ the name PureView…you’ll realise that it’s about using different technical approaches to vastly improve the imaging capabilities of the camera you always have with you – the camera in your pocket.

          Simple economics tells you why they haven’t released the 808 PureView direct to WP8 – a slimmer handset will sell far better than a humped camera. Apple have pretty much locked the smartphone market to the slimline rectangular shape – anything bulbous would not create a product you could easily tempt people from iPhones or Galaxys from. Then there’s the technical challenges – the level of specialised electronic and physical hardware needed for oversampling PureView is far harder to port to WP8 than the OIS mechanical tech. Give it time and they’ve have the 2 methods converged to a even better device than the 808 currently is – can you imagine it with amazing stabilization?

          I feel that you’re all being exceptionally shortsighted in your rants against it all being a Nokia/Elop conspiracy. It’s astounding tech that puts the rivals to shame again. Kevin Shields had an engadget interview where he said this:

          “Stay tuned. Getting a sensor the size of the one in the 808 suspended using this approach is going to take some really clever engineering. But, it’s a good thing we have some really clever engineers.”

          So, the 808′s true successor is in the works. And by then they might have PureView tech 3, 4 and 5 to throw in the mix to create something even more mind blowing than what we already have with the 808.

          I really hate that you all hate so easily, rather than seeing it as the progression it is – this is all tech that Nokia’s had backlogged in it’s labs that’s now got an software platform that’s begging for it. Rather than bemoaning that the 920 isn’t the 808, I’m happy to see it for it’s differentiating tech, and enjoy the ride of what Damian Dinning and his team keep throwing us :0)

          Whatever you might say, it seems now that under Elop there’s more of a drive to get Nokia’s innovations into products, rather than relying on large market share to keep the company going – the way it was being done before.
          Sure, they had great devices – but for me although the 920 doesn’t have all of the bits and pieces Symbian does, it’s leaps and bounds beyond most of the drivel the old establishment kept churning out – with promises (which I believe) that they’re working on getting all of Symbian’s functions into WP as it makes sense to close any capability gaps.
          I’m glad to see innovation become the company’s inspiration, not just profit and sales numbers through high volume/low innovation line up it had descended into.

          • Jeff

            Can we have the shorter version free of the pointless WoT?

          • James

            “So, the 808′s true successor is in the works. And by then they might have PureView tech 3, 4 and 5 to throw in the mix to create something even more mind blowing than what we already have with the 808.
            I really hate that you all hate so easily, rather than seeing it as the progression it is – this is all tech that Nokia’s had backlogged in it’s labs that’s now got an software platform that’s begging for it.”

            You’re wrong in asserting that this somehow wasn’t making it’s way to Harmattan & then MeeGo proper, possibly to Symbian in simpler forms too, if it did end-up staying in the mid-range.
            Although personally I would’ve preferred to have seen WP there, possibly in the top-end too, alongside Harmattan/MeeGo.
            In that scenario it would’ve been ideal to phase out Symbian slightly more quickly than has been planned (albeit in a far less self-destructive way).

            “Whatever you might say, it seems now that under Elop there’s more of a drive to get Nokia’s innovations into products, rather than relying on large market share to keep the company going.”

            And this was an approach that they were very much in the process of working towards, even before he came on board.

            • Rob

              The problem was they were working too slowly towards it – it’s taken a more radical approach for those within the company (like Marko Ahtisaari) to have the influence that they’ve needed to have to drive the new approach. I don’t diss MeeGo/Harmattan – in fact I’d have loved for that to have been a joint-option they could have taken post-Symbian.

              I don’t deny that MeeGo/Harmattan was the natural internal platform for them to get this tech into, it’s just that for those who had the power, Symbian was too much of a cash cow for them to drop in favour or a future-proof platform. Instead they dithered and MeeGo/Harmattan remained too much in the beta docks, instead of being fast-tracked in development as the perfect response to iOS and Android. Instead it got mismanaged and opportunities missed.

              The way I see it is people should understand that WP8 is the chosen direction for Nokia – it’s happened and they aren’t going back. For MeeGo and beyond we have Jolla, which I’m really looking forward to seeing out in the wild. Peeps might not like the idea of WP8 but it’s a reality, so they should be happy with how Nokia are making it their own and creating their own distinct environment in a (what I consider) good new OS that I’m looking forward to exploring.

              • James

                Yes resources towards it were very slow to reach a peak, which meant they didn’t deliver it as soon as (overoptimistically) planned, & there was one misstep in the project planning which further compounded things.*
                But they had surmounted that hill, it would’ve been very clear for management to see that internally, def. by mid 2011 at the latest, there would’ve been no more delays, certainly not on the scale that occurred.
                They had a very real opportunity to pursue both, & it was totally manageable (with a scaled-down & slightly more quickly EOL’d Symbian program), very odd that they didn’t.
                I don’t see how the current program’s “a more radical approach” than it could’ve been, far from it.
                Seems way more like a capitulation, when it really didn’t have to be…

                *still nothing like Symbian’s track-record & list of 2nd chances.

                • James

                  “it would’ve been very clear for management to see that internally, def. by mid 2011 at the latest”

                  Actually not even by mid 2011, it should’ve been apparent by Feb. at the latest, based on feedback from lead prototyping engineers like Felip Contreas.

                  • Rob

                    “I don’t see how the current program’s “a more radical approach” than it could’ve been, far from it.”

                    That’s the point – “could’ve been” – it should have been but wasn’t, so the current path is more radical than it was, not than it should have been. From the things I’ve read from interviews with those who left, Nokia was too much a quagmire of different departments and techs all working to their own ends for their own projects, without anyone at an upper level deciding to get all of these different areas to work towards a single product – it kept producing amazing stuff, but never to product to showcase it. Now it feels like that mentality is ramping up – get out the impressive kit in products, rather than ramping out similar products that merely keep the bsaeline pumping.

                    • James

                      Seems you totally miss my point, I’m referring to “could’ve been” in the sense of a dual OS strategy.

  • http://europe.nokia.com/pureview steelicon

    Nokia 808 PureView + Flash off + Night Mode.

    • http://www.hu.com tiqitoq

      Yeah! they should have set the 808 in Night Mode. Just like what they did to SGS3 & HTC One X.

  • http://ragsnram.com Rags

    They should not have used the flash on the 808.

  • LaW

    LOL, OWNAGE TO ALL THE HATERS, lumia 920 rules, always wanted a better nigh taking camera. this will definetly be my next phone

  • nish

    Have you gone through the Verge article caefully, Ali before writing this. 808 PureView picture is shot without firing Xenon. Check the EXIF. Had Xenon been fired it could have been a diffrent story.

  • Rafael Vinicius

    The name that is PUREFAKE.. Impossible any camera with led capture image if arent professional.
    Any people idiot trust in the camera Lumia 920? pfff

    • Mokia

      Shut up fool! Stop sending trolling info sucker! You know jack shit.

    • Pdexter

      Huh what’s your problem?
      It was taken by the verge, one of the biggest Nokia trolls and they right out said it kills other phones.

  • kornofilo

    by the way, did anyone saw the EXIF info? the photo was taken at 8:47 PM, the 808 pure view one and the lumia 900 were taken one hour after that.

    808 was using iso 800, not even 1600, and flash was of.

    i find extrange that there is EXIF info missing in the 920, maybe because of the pre-release software.

    lumia 900 gps went mad, i put the cordenades 40;45;0.28966149991 -73;58;34.5956284999 and it gave me some place in the ocean!

  • http://ruzesiah.blogfa.com/ saeed haghipour

    http://opda.ir/attachment.php?attachmentid=79372&d=1347079883

    plz see the topic ..

    nokia lumia 920 image is photoshop

    • Rafael Vinicius

      And have peoples trust in the Nokia Lumia.. GOD bless the peoples that no know nothing of smartphone!!

      “Im the thief of my pocket!!!”

      • rob

        Lol, you’re determined to hate even when the evidence tells you otherwise!

        Seriously, get over it and focus on the bona fide results taken with the 920 – we’ve all looked at them and we all can see the benefit of the device.

        “GOD bless the peoples that no know nothing of smartphone!!”

        I’m waiting for God to bless you then!

        • Rox

          If you’re gong to necro, at least necro something insightful/interesting, rather then respond to an overly simplistic, (basically) troll post, makes you not much better.

    • JGrove303

      you got an english equivalent to that arabic site?

      These were shot with members of TheVerge on site. What, is Nokia now a company that pays for reviews?

      This isn’t directed to just you, but to all naysayers:

      STFU and accept that Nokia is capable of developing such fabulous tech. This is why we are fans.

    • armin

      the photo of lumia 920 was compressed by admin of topic for easy upload…
      don’t give false information

  • http://ruzesiah.blogfa.com/ saeed haghipour

    I’m really sorry for myself that I was a fan of Nokia.
    Nokia is a liar. :(

    • migo

      You should be sorry that you’re an idiot. They didn’t lie.

    • n8thegreat

      How much are you being paid to say this you bloodsucking vulture, you paid shill? Who are you working for? Samsung? Google?

  • Andre

    Did you post the correct picture?

    The one with red scarf was from Nokia. The one taken by TheVerge is the final one which is slightly blur, but with the same brightness. All photoshot that were done with the model without a scarf.

  • Carbontubby

    There’s some nonsense EXIF in the Lumia 920 shot: f/0, flash fired, exposure 1, model QCAM-AA.

    The pic looks a bit soft with a lot of noise reduction applied but it’s great coming from a phone camera. It’s probably shot at ISO 1600 or higher, f/2 at 1/15s or 1/8s. The lens is equivalent to a 26mm lens so if the OIS provides +2 EV stabilization, that means you can handhold down to 1/8s and still get sharp images.

    Sorry, no other phone comes close :) It’s the combination of sensor, lens and software that makes up this particular incarnation of Pureview. Kudos to Nokia for being able to stuff all this into just a few square millimeters.

    • migo

      Exactly. Come 2 months when consumers have it in their hands, all the trolls here will be eating their words.

  • ahmed shouhdy

    the 808 @night mode would took a much brighter photo

  • Tak

    I hate how the Marketing Bonanza now makes 808′s camera look bad(compared to what it is), by comparing 920 with it. I have had great results in all kinds of situations with 808, that typically require dslr.

  • keirux

    I think that you are not really concious of what ISO means…the higher the ISO, the shorter the exposure time. More ISO = More light (and more noise). The idea is that 808 don’t provides the option of manual exposure time, is this was possible, the 808 could beat to the 920 (with a tripod, obviously not handheld)

  • keirux

    I think that you are not really concious of what ISO means…the higher the ISO, the shorter the exposure time. More ISO = More sensibility, wich means more light (and more noise). The idea is that 808 doesn’t provide the option of manual exposure time, is this was possible, the 808 could beat to the 920 (with a tripod, obviously not handheld)

    • James

      What are you talking about, it does allow you to manually adjust the ISO, that’s standard for many camera apps.

      • Keirux

        Yes, I know it, I was talking about the expusure time…is fully automatic on 808. My comment was intended to rebate this,
        ” Edit- For any one who keeps claiming that even this is staged, or rigged against the 808; here’s a short explanation, the 808 can take pictures at night; but Flash can only be used for taking a picture of a single object, you can’t rely on it to light up the landscape, and increasing the ISO means increasing the shutter time as well which makes it difficult to hold the camera steady (the whole point of OIS after all)- and you end up with a blurry mess. Here’s a picture I took with the 808, no flash but with the ISO at 200 (imagine if I were to use 1600 as some people were suggesting)- Total exposure time = 2.7Sec (try keeping your hand steady for that long)”

        ^this is wrong: the higher the ISO, the shorter the exposure time. Is fully automatic on 808, there is no way to set up a large exposure time without a ISO 50 or so and this is a really low ISO for night shots.

        • James

          You can manually set ISO to suit whatever your needs are on the 808, you can create your own customised night mode if needs be. Although the built-in (automatic) mode’s fine for most cases…

          • Allan

            Please read James’es answer again. He is stating that ISO is manually adjustable and that shutter speed cannot be adjusted manually. Shutter speed is handled automatically. So when you set a high ISO value, the camera will try to use the shortest possible shutter time, while still letting in enough light.

            Personally I’d love to be able to control shutter speed manually as well even in the 920. If placed on a tripod we might get some nice night pictures with that F2.0 sensor. Why? Well if you add these manual options for people who know how to use them they might be able to produce some great shots that could be great promotion for the tech. So don’t only focus on the “normal” everyday user.

            Am looking forward to more actual shots from production grade hardware and software. Then we shall see.

            • Allan

              Sorry I meant please read Keirux’es answer! I didn’t really help the confusion there, did I?

            • James

              Point taken, I misread….
              However, with a shutter of these characteristics you’re very rarely going to need/want to manually adjust:
              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nokia_808_PureView
              It already covers a very wide array of scenarios…

              • keirux

                Sorry James, by your answer I can assume that you are not into photography in a serious way. It’s fine, but…there is no discussion about the need of a manual exposure feature on 808. It’s really important this feature, without this, the 808 works more like a point&shoot.

                • James

                  Nokia has previously tried having a variable aperture (on the Nokia N86). That is, the aperture actually moves between multiple states. For example: f/2.4, f/4.8. When there is too much light, you need a smaller aperture (f/4.8) to reduce the amount of light as to stop it flooding the sensor. See here
                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/whatleydude/3716455775/in/set-72157621389989316/

                  However, the variable aperture is 1) expensive, 2) thick and 3) mechanical. So, the method Nokia now uses is a special ND (neutral density) filter. Every camera-centric Nokia since the N73 (including N82, N95, N8 and 808) has used an ND filter. The idea is that the filter blocks out the sunlight and allows shooting photos in direct sunlight.
                  The effect looks really nice and it’s a very nice tool in certain situations. One such situation is where you want a longer exposure (up to 2.7 seconds). See here
                  http://mynokiablog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Screen-Shot-2012-05-21-at-14.56.37.jpg

                  The ND filter in the 808 is ND8 (3 f-stops). That means that when the ND filter is in place, 1/8th of the light gets through the sensor. From f/2.4, this is equivalent to f/6.6.
                  Strangely, the 920 doesn’t have an ND filter. It has a huge aperture. There is going to be problems taking photos in direct sunlight.

                  Sure, no manual shutter adjustments, but this feature is a very important component of the shutter’s behaviour (or how it’s influenced)
                  That clear enough for you?

                  • keirux

                    James, I know that, I have the 808 and I´m a long term SLR user but…if you read what I wrote, you´ll realize that I just was talking about MANUAL EXPOSURE TIME, not about ISO, ND´s and aperture.
                    Aperture is solved with ND´s, ISO has manual control but exposure time is fully automatic.
                    Photography is all about this 3 parameters.
                    Without manual exposure there are a lot of scenarios not covered (i.e. astrophotography, night timelapse, etc).
                    Cheers.

                    • James

                      That’s cool, totally understood, my point was that for anyone but the hardest-core DSLR/PaS nut (which it’s not REALLY meant to compete with), the 808′s already very good.

                      Cheers.

            • keirux

              +1

  • Dietrich

    and the real question is, who made that???

  • noki

    Total exposure time = 2.7Sec no steady camera in the planet will take a good picture if you wigle as much as you did on the 808 photo.