Video & Gallery: Nokia Lumia 1020 Unboxing +Wireless Charging Cover

| September 19, 2013 | 46 Replies

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We’ve FINALLY gotten our hands on a Lumia 1020 fresh from Nokia, and it came in one of those awesome lens looking container thing. Check out the video below then hop down for the quick first impression and gallery.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kq7N623FSAc

In all honesty I wasn’t the biggest fan for the black 1020, I was on the fence between the yellow and white, as I thought the contrast between the camera hump and the white/yellow would look pretty cool, but the black is pretty nice as well. The big thing that struck me right away about the 1020 was how light it was (compared to the 920), it’s amazing to think all that weight comes from the charging coil (I find that hard to believe); in fact the 1020 + the wireless charging cover still don’t weigh as much as the 920. The black finish is certainly awesome though, it gives the phone a very sleek profile, that makes it feel like a special agent’s secret weapon.

I still haven’t played around with the camera much so I can’t give any real thoughts on that, but I think the 808 had more lossless zoom in it? Of course there are plenty more of posts on the way, but this was just a quick first impression. Check out the gallery below for some side-by sides and comparisons.

*Oh and check out the Nokia 909.1 below ;)

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Category: Lumia, Nokia, Video, Windows Phone

About the Author ()

Hey, my name's Ali- Currently a fifth (and final) year Dental Student from Chicago; studying in Jordan. I love all sorts of gadgets almost as much as I love my cookies! Be sure to follow my Twitter handle @AliQudsi and Subcribe to my Youtube for the latest videos - no pressure. Thanks.
  • Janne

    The ones on sale today in Finland don’t say Lumia 909.1, they say Lumia 909.1/Lumia 1020 in the product box sticker.

    So there are many kinds of stickers and markings in rotation! :)

    omething for the sentimentalists in the audience:

    On Finnish mobile phone forums there is news that the Lumia 1020, which came on sale here today, has “Lumia 909.1/Lumia 1020″ printed on the top of the product sticker on the boxes, where normally just Lumia 1020 would be. Apparently this was in addition to the usual RM number.

    It was speculated this is because Nokia certified the phone as 909 (maybe regulations demand to use that name on the box), but later changed their mind about the marketing name.

    Aliqudsi says:
    September 19, 2013 at 11:19 am

    Can confirm, mine has it! :D

  • SLAYER

    early batch most likely.

  • Janne

    By the way, is that fabricy pull-out tag on the box a new feature? I remember it previously being cardboard in other such Nokia boxes.

    The piece of fabric is even color-coordinated, it is yellow on yellow phones for example. Nice detail there. Nokia certainly has learned Apple-esque tricks in recent years, except in a more Nokia look of course.

    • http://twitter.com/haranguemnb Harangue

      Yep, appears to be a new thing. Had it on the 925 as well. Pretty convenient. Don’t know about the color coordination though.

    • aliqudsi

      Yep, the fabric pull out was first on the 925 and it does represent the phone color (some lower end phones still come with cardboard pullouts with the backdrop of the pullout representing the color- I think you can see it in both the 501 and 625 unboxing galleries).

      but yes it’s definitely a nice touch.

  • http://facebook.com/arthjar Arth.

    I wanted to see the charging cover on lol

    • Janne

      It is on in the middle pictures?

      • aliqudsi

        Yeah, the cover is on the pictures. Very sleek as you can see

        • https://www.facebook.com/ArthJar Arth.

          I was on my Lumia and my sight is very poor, but I can see them on my computer lol.
          Indeed, it’s there, so sleek!

  • jfly9978

    What firmware shipped with this device?

    • DesR85

      Amber, the latest update.

  • Edi_Opteron

    As i can recall, ATT version doesn’t have a headset in the box.
    Ali does it have headsets inside the box?

    • Janne

      AT&T Lumias have lacked headphones. Normal Nokia boxed Lumias always have headphones. Nokia.fi confirms for Lumia 1020: “Nokia-stereokuulokkeet WH-208″

      • Edi_Opteron

        Thanks Janne. Time to relief a bit after these post MS acquisition news.
        Eagerly waiting for it to become available in MEA.

        • aliqudsi

          As Janne said it did come with headphones, the same that came with the 920 and 820 I believe. The ones that match the color of the phone.

          • edi_opteron

            Yeah. That’s cool. I’ve gone crazy when I see this matching colors between headphones and the handset

  • Marcel D. Juhnke

    Did your’s come with the lanyard or was that extra? My box didn’t have a lanyard, only charger, USB cable and earphones… :(

    • aliqudsi

      No the lanyard I used was the one from the 808.

      • Marcel D. Juhnke

        Damn, and I can’t use that anymore, because I accidentally ripped it off one day while pulling out my 808 out of my pocket with it…

      • n8thebest

        Huh? Nokia confirmed that the 1020 comes with a lanyard, very strange. Or is that only AT&T models that come with a lanyard?

        This is all very confusing.

      • n8thebest

        I checked Nokia’s website, and this is silly!

        Global unbranded version of the 1020 does NOT come with a lanyard:
        http://www.nokia.com/global/products/phone/lumia1020/specifications/

        The US AT&T version does come with a lanyard:
        http://www.nokia.com/us-en/phones/phone/lumia1020/specifications/#sales-package

        This is stupid! If anyone from Nokia is reading this, you guys are stupid for such a move! Why not make the lanyard STANDARD on ALL 1020s worldwide?

        This is the kind of silly thinking at Nokia that pisses me off.

  • Deaconclgi

    Congratulations on the gift.

    It looks like the unbranded 1020 comes with the same lanyard that the 808 came with. The ATT 1020 comes with a much cheaper lanyard that doesn’t have the silver Nokia piece and is made of a different material.

    • aliqudsi

      Actually that is the 808s lanyard, good eye ;) I repurposed it for the 1020 seeing how mine didn’t come with one :/

  • Grazy

    So they sent you a charging cover with a charging plate? I guess you have one of those already?

    Picking mine up on 25-Sep-13 :) Just had a text to say its in at O2. will be getting all the goodies too

    • aliqudsi

      Nah, I already had the plate (from the fatboy) they sent me the case for the 1020 only.

  • Janne

    Speaking of lanyards, the Nokia Lumia 1020 Camera Grip includes a leather lanyard.

    • Marcel D. Juhnke

      That’s good to know, I’m planning on buying the camera grip anyway in the next weeks, now that my wife gifted me the 1020 :)

  • Mendax

    Is this the RM-875? Does it support the 1700 band? Even if the box doesn’t say, any chamce you could pop in a TMo USA SIM to try? :)

    • Janne

      Yes, 909.1 is RM-875.

      RM-875, Global variant: EGSM 850/900/1800/1900, WCDMA 850/900/1900/2100, LTE band 1 (2100), 3 (1800), 7 (2600), 8 (900) & 20 (800), LTE Cat 3 (100 Mbps Downlink, 50 Mbps Uplink), HSDPA+ Cat24 (42.1 Mbps), HSUPA Cat 6 (5.76 Mbps)

      http://developer.nokia.com/Devices/Device_specifications/Lumia_1020/

      • Mendax

        The reason I ask is that the global version of the 920 supports AWS, even though it is not officially stated in the specs.

  • Werner Ruotsalainen

    Guys,

    DPReview has just published their standard studio shots of the iPhone 5s:

    http://www.dpreview.com/articles/2170241431/iphone-5s-studio-comparison?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=news-list&utm_medium=text-comment&ref=comments_0_0#comments

    The same database also contains the 1020, the iPhone 5 and some other smartphone flagships.

    A quick note: Regrettably, the Nokia 808, the LG G2 or the Sony Z1 aren’t in the DPReview database. Regarding the latter, only the older Z is available and it delivers really inferior results to any of the current flagships. As far as the current data on the LG G2 is concerned, it, regrettably, has considerably lower video resolution and higher sharpening than the rest of high-end phones (1020, iPhone 5/5s, GS4). It has around 900p resolution according to GSMArena’s comparometer at http://www.gsmarena.com/vidcmp.php3?idType=3&idPhone1=5543&idPhone2=5371&idPhone3=4910 , while the iPhone 4S and 5 nicely deliver true 1080p. As I’ve pointed out several times, the Samsung GS4 doesn’t seem to have a low-pass filter. The results of this can easily be spotted in the video results: as with the faulty downsampler of the 1020, it introduces tons of false detail over the Nyquist threshold. This is unacceptable. Let me the real-world results of this, compared to the 808 and the LG G2 (I’ve selected the G2 here to prove it indeed has soemwhat lower resolution in video than the 808 / all the 1080p-capable iPhones):

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854600536/

    See the absolutely awful aliasing effects over the 10-11 signs, not present in the 808 / G2 framegrabs?

    The 1020 has, when using its full-res mode and doing the downsampling on the desktop (to avoid the messed-up in-camera downsampling in the 1020), has considerably better IQ than the iPhone 5s, let alone the iPhone 5. (The 5s indeed has considerably less noise but it’s in no way as clean as the 1020, assuming the same target size. You can easily make the DPReview comparometer do the downsampling online by clicking the “Print” icon in the upper right.)

    I’ve made two crops clearly showing this. The first ISO12233 reschart crop + color saturation tester:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854528645/

    As you can see, the 5s, while having the same effective resolution, produces a far less noisy image than the iPhone 5. The properly (again, not using the currently pretty cr@ppy in-camera downsampler!) downsampled full-res image of the 1020, on the other hand, delivers way less noise and considerably more effective resolution. The GS4′s downsampled image has about the same noise and resolution as the 5s (and significantly less noise than the 5). It, therefore, can’t come close to that of the 1020.

    A “real-world” (read: no-12233) resolution and noise tester:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854591373/

    The 1020 is the best of the four here too. The GS4 shows a lot of oversharpening effects but, despite those, just can’t deliver the “Nationalbank” subtitle reliably. The subtitle is almost unreadable on the two iPhones’ shot. The rendition quality of the upper right coin, with pretty much homogenous color, is the best on the 1020. The upper left one’s rendition particularly suffers from the GS4′s oversharpening.

    Corner softness & CA in practice

    We all know how bad the 1020 is in the corners (as opposed to the 808). Let’s compare it to the three above smartphones!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9855098156/

    (Upper right corner. The lens behave in exactly the same way on all the four tested cameras in all corners. That is, this corner is representative of corner sharpness & CA.)

    As you can see, the 1020 definitely lags behind the others. Yes, as I’ve recommended in my previous article at http://mynokiablog.com/2013/07/18/mnb-rg-nokia-1020-still-image-quality-any-good/ , you WILL want to use cropping if you shoot in 16:9. Let me point out again that, if you crop 16:9 to 3:2 horizontally but not vertically (that is, not removing any of the pixel rows, only the columns), you can get rid of the entire offending area, which is 10% on both sides. Just make sure you compose your shoot accordingly and don’t let anything important in the outermost 10% region. While this certainly reduces the field-of-view of the lens, it’ll still be around 33mm equiv after the crop – that is, that of the iPhone 5 / 5s in stills mode.

    Interestingly, the 5s seems to behave somewhat worse in the corners than the 5. The latter is definitely sharper there. The best is the GS4, oversharpening aside.

    Conclusion

    All in all,

    - the 5s delivers better, less noisy images than the iPhone 5
    - it, however, has somewhat worse corner sharpness than the previous model (as was easy to predict, given that the lens is brighter and the sensor larger, while the lens is of the same size. 808 vs. 1020 effect, albeit not as pronounced.)
    - the 1020 delivers considerably better images, both noise- and resolution-wise, than any of the iPhones, if you shoot full-size and downsample on the desktop. Before it’s fixed, avoid using the output in-camera downsampler for serious shooting!
    - however, the 1020 has definitely worse corner & left/right border sharpness than even the iPhone 5s, let alone the, in this regard, better-than-5s iPhone 5. Shoot in 16:9 and crop afterwards to compltely get rid of the problem.

    (Mods,

    1, feel free to re-post this as a reader article if you find it useful.
    2, delete the above link-less version of this same article. I’ve posted them to avoid having to wait in the moderation queue.)

    • Werner Ruotsalainen

      BTW, I’ve created two very interesting comparative crops, now, using another region of the original DPRewiew test chart: the three-colored text on the top center.

      This is the print-res (the 38 Mpixel 1020 / 13 Mpixel GS4 shots downsampled so that they can be directly compared to the 8 Mpixel iPhone 5 / 5s shots) comparison between the four top smartphones:

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9862482523/

      The two iPhones deliver pretty much the same, legibility-wise. The iPhone 5 applies a little more sharpening because of the stronger NR, which makes text a little bit less readable. However, the difference is negligible.

      The GS4 fares significantly better than the two iPhones and, as was easy to predict, the 1020 delivers the best results. With the latter, approximately the first eight rows of the text can be read, while with the iPhone 5s, about the first three and, with the GS4, about the first six. The iPhone 5 fares the worst in this test because of its aggressive sharpening – it’s not possible to safely read even the first three rows.

      With this text, it’s REALLY worth checking out the resolution advantage of the full-res shoot. This is the full-res comparison between the four top smartphones:

      http://www.flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9862390964/

      As you can see, it’s only the last three rows of the text that can’t be read – a much-much better result than even that pf the GS4, let alone the two iPhones.

      That is, this test definitely shows the 1020 has much better effective resolution in low(ish) light than any of the three other phones. (Again, all this when using the native, full-res image.)

      (Mods, if you decide to post my original comment-article as a separate article, feel free to include this one at the end, before the “Conclusions” section.)

      • Random Random

        Yes.

        This tells pretty much nothing about real world usage for the mobile literates.

  • Werner Ruotsalainen

    Guys,

    DPReview has just published their standard studio shots of the iPhone 5s:

    dpreview.com/articles/2170241431/iphone-5s-studio-comparison?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=news-list&utm_medium=text-comment&ref=comments_0_0#comments

    The same database also contains the 1020, the iPhone 5 and some other smartphone flagships.

    A quick note: Regrettably, the Nokia 808, the LG G2 or the Sony Z1 aren’t in the DPReview database. Regarding the latter, only the older Z is available and it delivers really inferior results to any of the current flagships. As far as the current data on the LG G2 is concerned, it, regrettably, has considerably lower video resolution and higher sharpening than the rest of high-end phones (1020, iPhone 5/5s, GS4). It has around 900p resolution according to GSMArena’s comparometer at gsmarena.com/vidcmp.php3?idType=3&idPhone1=5543&idPhone2=5371&idPhone3=4910 , while the iPhone 4S and 5 nicely deliver true 1080p. As I’ve pointed out several times, the Samsung GS4 doesn’t seem to have a low-pass filter. The results of this can easily be spotted in the video results: as with the faulty downsampler of the 1020, it introduces tons of false detail over the Nyquist threshold. This is unacceptable. Let me the real-world results of this, compared to the 808 and the LG G2 (I’ve selected the G2 here to prove it indeed has soemwhat lower resolution in video than the 808 / all the 1080p-capable iPhones):

    flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854600536/

    See the absolutely awful aliasing effects over the 10-11 signs, not present in the 808 / G2 framegrabs?

    The 1020 has, when using its full-res mode and doing the downsampling on the desktop (to avoid the messed-up in-camera downsampling in the 1020), has considerably better IQ than the iPhone 5s, let alone the iPhone 5. (The 5s indeed has considerably less noise but it’s in no way as clean as the 1020, assuming the same target size. You can easily make the DPReview comparometer do the downsampling online by clicking the “Print” icon in the upper right.)

    I’ve made two crops clearly showing this. The first ISO12233 reschart crop + color saturation tester:

    flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854528645/

    As you can see, the 5s, while having the same effective resolution, produces a far less noisy image than the iPhone 5. The properly (again, not using the currently pretty cr@ppy in-camera downsampler!) downsampled full-res image of the 1020, on the other hand, delivers way less noise and considerably more effective resolution. The GS4′s downsampled image has about the same noise and resolution as the 5s (and significantly less noise than the 5). It, therefore, can’t come close to that of the 1020.

    A “real-world” (read: no-12233) resolution and noise tester:

    flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9854591373/

    The 1020 is the best of the four here too. The GS4 shows a lot of oversharpening effects but, despite those, just can’t deliver the “Nationalbank” subtitle reliably. The subtitle is almost unreadable on the two iPhones’ shot. The rendition quality of the upper right coin, with pretty much homogenous color, is the best on the 1020. The upper left one’s rendition particularly suffers from the GS4′s oversharpening.

    Corner softness & CA in practice

    We all know how bad the 1020 is in the corners (as opposed to the 808). Let’s compare it to the three above smartphones!

    flickr.com/photos/33448355@N07/9855098156/

    (Upper right corner. The lens behave in exactly the same way on all the four tested cameras in all corners. That is, this corner is representative of corner sharpness & CA.)

    As you can see, the 1020 definitely lags behind the others. Yes, as I’ve recommended in my previous article at http://mynokiablog.com/2013/07/18/mnb-rg-nokia-1020-still-image-quality-any-good/ , you WILL want to use cropping if you shoot in 16:9. Let me point out again that, if you crop 16:9 to 3:2 horizontally but not vertically (that is, not removing any of the pixel rows, only the columns), you can get rid of the entire offending area, which is 10% on both sides. Just make sure you compose your shoot accordingly and don’t let anything important in the outermost 10% region. While this certainly reduces the field-of-view of the lens, it’ll still be around 33mm equiv after the crop – that is, that of the iPhone 5 / 5s in stills mode.

    Interestingly, the 5s seems to behave somewhat worse in the corners than the 5. The latter is definitely sharper there. The best is the GS4, oversharpening aside.

    Conclusion

    All in all,

    - the 5s delivers better, less noisy images than the iPhone 5
    - it, however, has somewhat worse corner sharpness than the previous model (as was easy to predict, given that the lens is brighter and the sensor larger, while the lens is of the same size. 808 vs. 1020 effect, albeit not as pronounced.)
    - the 1020 delivers considerably better images, both noise- and resolution-wise, than any of the iPhones, if you shoot full-size and downsample on the desktop. Before it’s fixed, avoid using the output in-camera downsampler for serious shooting!
    - however, the 1020 has definitely worse corner & left/right border sharpness than even the iPhone 5s, let alone the, in this regard, better-than-5s iPhone 5. Shoot in 16:9 and crop afterwards to compltely get rid of the problem.

    (Mods,

    1, feel free to re-post the above (currently in the moderation queue) version of this article as a reader comment article if you find it useful.
    2, feel free to delete this comment when you approve the “linked” version of this article, currently in the moderation queue. I’ve posted this, link-less version to avoid having to wait in the moderation queue.)

    • Random Random

      I see.

      So, according to you, iPhone 5S beats 1020 in real world usage because it produced better quality in 8MP out of the box. At least in most situations.

      Yes, normal people don’t carry around a PC for downsampling (with the tripod and tons of cables and adapters as some Nokia owners seem to do) at a later time and normals people don’t also do that at a later time.

      Well.

      This was actually quite surprising.

  • Werner Ruotsalainen

    “So, according to you, iPhone 5S beats 1020 in real world usage because it produced better quality in 8MP out of the box.”

    I’ve never stated anything like that as I couldn’t directly compare the in-camera 5 Mpixel image of the 1020 to that of the 5s. It’s not known how the two compare to each other.

    I only recommend shooting full-res images for the best possible images. Again, unlike what you’ve thought I had stated, the comparative IQ differences between the 5s and the 1020 aren’t known.

    “at a later time and normals people don’t also do that at a later time.”

    At least YOU assume so – wrong. However, the 1020 (just liek the 808) is targeted at tech and camera / shooting-savvy people – ones that would prefer to have the best IQ. They surely will shoot fullres and do the conversion with the best settings – as they’re the same people that love tinkering with the RAW conversion tools on the desktop.

    • Random Random

      Sure, 1020 downsamples that nicely. The difference definitely is not known if you claim that. Yes, that must be the truth.

      1020 is probably targeted for tech literate people, but for some reason most of Nokia’s marketing material is not. Care to explain?

      On the other hand iPhone has never been targeted for the tech literate but for the mobile literate.

      About the normal people.

      No.

      You are wrong.

      Normal people use the device and most of the pictures they take are processed on device. Not on PC. That’s why the quality on the device matters and post processing on PC doesn’t.

      You would know that if you were mobile literate.

      • Werner Ruotsalainen

        “1020 is probably targeted for tech literate people, but for some reason most of Nokia’s marketing material is not. Care to explain?”

        Because 99,9% of phone users are tech illiterates – this is hy Nokia think they should target the tech illiterate.

        Actually, this is what led to Windows Mobile’s / Symbian’s death and iPhone’s victory. The former two, while offering a LOT more features, were just too complicated for the Average Joes. Heck, even I have sometimes a hard time finding how a particular setting needs to be changed on my old s60v3 or WM6 phones (I have many of them and sometimes still need to use some of them / help people with them)…

        • Random Random

          Tech literates are irrelevant.

          Mobile literates are relevant and unfortunately most of the tech literates are not mobile literate.

          Designing and manufacturing devices for those 0,1% people who are tech literate is not reasonable. It’s actually a niche market not worth capturing for almost any big player.

          Mobile literates are people who understand the value of mobile. They have mobile device taking care of everything if they want to. That’s what is important today.

          Nokia would die if they focused on tech literates instead of mobile literates.

          • Werner Ruotsalainen

            “Nokia would die if they focused on tech literates instead of mobile literates.”

            History has indeed taught them this. As Microsoft as well. No wonder they switched to a super-easy-to-handle OS (WP) instead of their highly complicated (and, therefore, after iPhone’s getting popular, by the customers pretty much abandoned) previous ones (WMobile, Symbian).

            (It’s not the, particularly with Symbian, not-exactly-stellar stability, HW support etc. that alienated the Average Joes from these two OS’es but their overly complicated handling.)

            • Random Random

              Yes.

              That’s why iOS was so much better compared to Symbian.

              It’s not about the number of the features but about the number of the features the user can actually use.

              In the end of the day Symbian was not able to match iOS.

              • Werner Ruotsalainen

                “That’s why iOS was so much better compared to Symbian.”

                Much easier to use, yes. Much more feature-rich? No way, particularly not in the beginning. (Not even copy/paste, let alone multitasking etc.)

                It was also their being pretty complicated that led to Symbian / Windows Mobile’s death.

                • Random Random

                  Well.

                  Actually iOS quite soon became more feature rich – for the end user – compared to Symbian.

                  Symbian or S60 got a real copy paste only after iOS. The “copy paste” implementation S60 had for years was so flawed that it was mostly unusable for the reals users who were mobile literate.

                  Apple had to teach Nokia how to implement that. It was Apple who had a true copy paste the users could use for web pages and even for pictures. With S60 people could only dream of features like that.

                  Most of the features supported by S60 were jokes compared to features implemented on iOS.

                  User Interface was just one feature S60 had but that was pretty much unusable for normal people. Same applies for most of the features S60 had. That’s why in the end of the day iOS had more really usable features. Like the web browser. S60 was missing a really usable web browser.

                  I’m not an iOS fanboy but I’m mobile literate. That’s why I can know the mobile.

                  • Werner Ruotsalainen

                    “Symbian or S60 got a real copy paste only after iOS. The “copy paste” implementation S60 had for years was so flawed that it was mostly unusable for the reals users who were mobile literate. ”

                    It was complicated? Yes. It was unusable for tech-savvy users? Nope. While it really was inconsistent, I could make use of it even back in 2007.

                    BTW, Apple’s implementation is still buggy, compared to even that of Opera Mini running on iOS and using the “tap and move for selection”. In many cases it’s plain impossible to select a given, say, paragraph in iOS, unlike in other OS’es (or Opera Mini).

                    • Random Random

                      Tech-sawy users are usually mobile illiterate so it’s no wonder you can’t really understand why Symbian’s (S60) copy paste in 2007 wasn’t just complicated. It was lacking features Apple was the first to introduce when they launched the true copy paste for iOS.

                      If you don’t agree with me, please tell me how to copy paste text and pictures from a web page with a 2007 S60 phone?

                      Yes.

                      I’m mobile literate and that’s why I know Nokia didn’t have real copy paste before Apple.

                      With Apple’s implementation I can copy paste stuff not possible with Nokia’s implementation.

                      This is just one example of how iOS had more features than S60.

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